Month: June, 2017

This Is A Bio Inspired 3D Printed Spider Octopod Robot

T8 robot

The T8 octopod robot is modeled after a real tarantula, and the way it moves is startlingly realistic an effect that’s amplified by its high-resolution 3D-printed shell, which conceals the robotics inside

Each T8 moves with the help of 26 Hitec HS-35HD servo motors. Three in each leg and two to move the body and is pre-programmed using Robugtix’s Bigfoot Inverse Kinematics Engine, which handles the calculations for factors like trajectory planning and gait and motor control.




All the operator has to do is press buttons on the controller, which communicates with the robot via an XBee radio module.

It’s an impressively spooky little critter, though. Check it out in the video below.

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Pass it on: Popular Science

Light Up Your Day With These LED Flashlight With The Size Of A Match

MBI Matchbox

Over at Tokyo-based MBI Matchbook they created the world’s tiniest LED flashlights that look very much like real matches – they are small enough to always keep them in your pocket or a wallet in case of emergency.

8 miniature flashlights housed in a convenient matchbook style holder are waterproof and fully submersible, meaning they’ll work just fine even if you dive with them in a pool.



If you aren’t a fan of a red LED tint, you can also opt for a white or a green one. Each of the flashlights has a run time of approximately 8 hours, so if you go out camping, they’ll be your best buddies for about 64 hours in total.

The tiny flashlight uses a lithium tube type battery, which has 3mm in diameter and is approximately 20mm long. At the bottom of the battery there is a 3mmx3mm neodymium magnet, coated with a plastic-rubber sheath to ensure additional protection.

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Pass it on: Popular Science

This Mad Inventor Creates A Morning Breakfast Machine

sunday breakfast machine

This is the ‘Sunday Morning Breakfast Machine’ and it is, quite simply, the future of hangovers.

With just one push of a button it will toast your bread, make you the perfect cup of breakfast tea and then serve you a perfectly boiled egg.




Creative Peter Browne, 69, spent about 1,000 hours building the innovative contraption with pal Mervyn Huggett.  Retired airline pilot and silversmith Peter says he’s been coming up with inventions his entire life, but this is his pride and joy.

He said: “It took a total of 1,000 hours. It was hard work for three months but it was worth it.”

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Pass it on: Popular Science

The Origami Of Paper Microscope

See the invisible with a powerful yet affordable microscope that fits in your pocket. Curiosity, discovery, and science for everyone!

The Foldscope, a portable and versatile microscope made mostly out of paper (water-proof), magnifies the wonders of the microscopic world, without the bulk and expense of a conventional research microscope.

Foldscope is designed to bring microscopy out of science laboratories and into the hands of people around the world.




Foldscope is a real microscope, with magnification and resolution sufficient for imaging live individual cells, cellular organelles, embryos, swimming bacteria and much more.

Because the Foldscope is so affordable and can be used anywhere, it brings science to your daily life, whether that means looking at what’s growing in your flower pot or watching bacteria from your mouth or analyzing the bee stinger that got your thumb.

Our goal is to encourage and enable the curious explorer in each of us and make science happen anywhere, anytime.

 

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Pass it on: Popular Science

This Mechanical Instructor Can Guide And Teach Anyone How To Dance

waltz robot

Researchers have developed a waltzing robot that can teach people how to dance. This robot can take the lead, allowing the robot to teach dance sequences.

While the system has been developed for dancing, it could also have other applications including physical rehabilitation and sports training.

The system adjusts its difficulty mode based on the user’s number of previous practices and performance history.




The bot, which stands 1.8 meters tall (5 feet 9 inches), was designed by researchers at Tohoku University in Japan.

According to the authors of the study, the bot its designed for contact with adults with heights ranging from 1.5 meters (4 feet 9 inches) to 1.9 meters (6 feet two inches) meters tall.

It has a force sensor and two laser rangefinders to track movements, which are compared against motion-capture data originally recorded from professional dancers.

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Pass it on: New Scientist

This App Will Let You Call An Uber Just by Clicking Your Heels

ruby heels

Every little girl who watched The Wizard of Oz thought one thing: I want those ruby slippers. They were so beautiful, sparkly, colorful, and bright, like Christmas molded into a low heel and round toe.

And the idea that you could get home with three ladylike clicks of the heel warmed our lazy little hearts. Certainly a lot more glamorous than hailing down a cab like a wild banshee or digging through the depths of your bag for your phone to request an Uber.



Well, thanks to technology, it seems that perhaps some dreams really do come true. A creative agency called iStrategyLabs just unveiled the aptly named Dorothy, a device that will give you powers much like our favorite stranded Kansan.

All you have to do is slip “the ruby” a small Bluetooth-enabled micro-controller into your shoe, click your heels three times, and wait for your Uber to arrive.

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Pass it on: New Scientist

An Army Of These Robotic Turtles Might Help Rid The World Of Landmines

robot turtle

Detecting landmines is no easy task, but thankfully, a team of researchers at the Arizona State University is developing a fleet of robotic turtles to locate (and detonate) them in the desert.

These robot turtles could safely tag landmines without risking human lives.

Every year, an estimated 15,000 to 20,000 people are killed or maimed by landmines, according to UNICEF. Militaries around the globe currently use an array of both low and high-tech approaches to remove them from metal detectors and trained bomb-sniffing dogs.




Unlike bomb-sniffing dogs, these robotic turtles have the ability to work independently in the field. Seeing as the current prototypes are intended for use all over the globe, researchers are programming them with algorithms that allow them to react and adjust to different environment.

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Pass it on: New Scientist

Robots Can Now Flawlessly Iron Clothes

TEO robot

Ironing clothes is not fun. But someone has to do it. Why not get a robot to get it done?

TEO is a robot with a camera and sensors that can do just that. Once you put a clothing item on its ironing board, TEO uses its camera to create a 3D representation of the garment and calculate the wrinkles local descriptor.




The robot takes into account all wrinkles and works the iron to smooth out each crease. TEO measures 1.8 meters tall, weighing at 80 kilograms.

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Pass it on: New Scientist

A Cardboard Bicycle Is Now A Reality

Israeli cycling enthusiast Izhar Gafni is the one behind this cardboard bicycle, where it is not only highly affordable at just $10, it is also eco-friendly and lightweight.

The pieces of cardboard have been painstakingly bent and folded into what initially resembles that of a shipping package on wheels.

Once done, all of it is dunked into a bit of resin, before a layer of pearly paint is added, and you end up with beautiful looking bicycle, albeit at a relatively cheap price.

Since it is made out of cardboard, the coat of resin has a special role to play. It makes the entire cardboard bits and pieces waterproof.

So that riders are able to glide through puddles or a rain storm without having your ride all apart or unable to take your weight due to the sogginess.

There is also an attachable electric motor accessory just in case you need to have that extra boost in speed.

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Pass it on: Popular Science

Device To Protect Brain From Concussion Inspired By A Woodpecker

For the past several years, preventing brain injury for football players has been a top priority for many organizations around the country – from high schools, to colleges, to the NFL.

Now, a new helmet technology invented by a Texas Tech University student may be able to help prevent concussions in players by mimicking the way a Woodpecker’s brain is protected from repeated hits to the head

Alberto Garcia has been working on this technology since he was just 15 years old. While playing high school football he suffered a concussion and was told he wouldn’t be able to play any more. The disappointment of this drove him to further develop his idea.

Alberto Garcia’s football helmet and shoulder-pad system protects the brain the same way a Woodpecker’s brain is protected from repeated hits to the head.

“I was 15, a sophomore in high school, when I started this project — I knew what materials I needed, but didn’t know how to build it or code it just yet,” said Garcia.

Garcia’s initial idea was sparked by observing certain animal behaviors. He noticed that woodpeckers and long-horned rams suffer repeated blows to the head on a daily basis, but never sustain a brain injury. Why is that?

As it turns out, it’s because these animals have natural stabilizers in their necks. The stabilizers prevent their head from quickly whipping back and forth when they’re banging their head against something.

Humans lack these stabilizers, which causes us to suffer whiplash upon a hard hit to the head and contributes to brain damage.

While it’s still in the testing phase, Garcia’s helmet system could be a literal game-changer for football. If the technology is adopted and refined by schools and professional organizations, it could even save lives.

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Pass it on: Popular Science