Month: March, 2018

Nike Unveils The Next Generation Of Flyknit: Flyknit 360

According to Nike, Flyknit debuted at the 2012 London Olympic Games on the Nike Flyknit Racer. Six years later, Nike is on to the next generation: Flyknit 360.

Nike Flyknit is the product of a digitally engineered knitting process that knits a flat upper; that upper is then attached to a midsole to construct a shoe.

Today, Nike has announced a new advancement in Flyknit: now, a shoe upper can be constructed in a complete 360-degree form that wraps the entire foot.

According to Nike, engineers use complex knitting structures to create a closed anatomical form that mimics the shape of the foot to construct this upper.




Afterwards, the upper is put through a thermoforming process that applies shape and support underfoot.

Nike has said that the benefits of its new Flyknit 360 are threefold. First, wearers should be better locked in because the new construction offers a closer fit that reduces movement in the shoe.

Second, Nike says the 360-degree form will improve agility and quickness by minimizing the space between the foot and the ground.

And third, the new Nike Flyknit should be more sustainable; because it is precision engineered down to the individual stitch it produces 60% less waste than traditional cut-and-sew methods.

Like many of Nike’s innovations, this new Nike Flyknit 360 will appear in its Mercurial soccer boots; the Mercurial Superfly 360 and Mercurial Vapor 360.

Both boots are now available for purchase on nike.com.

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China’s New Stealth Fighter Is Finally Combat-Ready

China’s long-anticipated J-20 stealth fighter aircraft have arrived … kind of.

In a post on the state outlet Xinhua News Agency, the Chinese government announced that the fighter jet — created to counter the capabilities of the American F-22 Raptor — has entered service in the People’s Liberation Army with “comprehensive combat capabilities.”

The J-20, like the F-22 Raptor, uses a specially-shaped airframe and advanced materials to minimize its radar signature — making it hard for enemies to detect by conventional means.

The advanced aircraft has long been the subject of intense speculation, with details about its design and technology trickling out in dribs and drabs.

While the J-20 is operational, it doesn’t yet have the capabilities to match its American counterparts, the South China Morning Post, a major Hong Kong newspaper, reported.




Two military sources told the Post that the J-20s in service aren’t equipped with the WS-15 engines they were built to fly with.

According to the Post’s reporting, a WS-15 engine exploded in 2015 during a ground test, indicating quality-control issues with the single-crystal turbine blades necessary for the powerful turbofan engine.

The operational J-20s, the Post reported, are instead equipped with less powerful, modified WS-10B engines designed for the previous-generation Chinese fighters, the J-10s and J-11s.

And even with enhancements for use in the J-20, they aren’t powerful enough to enable the J-20s to “supercruise” like U.S. stealth fighters.

Only two other countries, the U.S. and Russia, build “fifth-generation fighters” like the J-20.

The U.S. has the F-22 Raptor as well as the uber-expensive, slow-to-arrive F-35. Russia flies the Sukhoi T-50 PAK-FA stealth fighter. India and Japan also have fifth-generation fighters in development.

The exact definition of “fifth generation” is a bit vague.

But public documents from China Power, an American project geared toward researching Chinese power suggest that fifth-gen aircraft are stealthy even when armed, can cruise at supersonic speeds and involve advanced computing, sensors and electronics.

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Are Quantum Computers On The Verge Of A Breakthrough?

Get Brilliant at http://www.brilliant.org/answerswithjoe/ And the first 295 to sign up for a premium account get 20% off every month!

For years now, quantum computers have been just out of reach, but some exciting new developments over the last year indicate that the age of quantum computing is a lot closer than we think.

 

Check out Jason’s channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCS-u…

LINKS LINKS LINKS:

D-Wave video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zvfkX…

Quantum Annealing Explained: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UV_Rl…

Supercooled qubits: https://newatlas.com/stable-supercool…

IBM’s new Neuromorphic chip: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nE819…

Google Bristlecone: https://www.sciencenews.org/article/g…

Silicon based quantum chip: https://gizmodo.com/new-silicon-chip-…

NASA Scientists Believe We Will Find Alien Life Within The Next 20 Years

It’s not exactly the Hollywood fantasy of flying saucers beaming down big-headed, wide-eyed aliens to Earth, but top NASA scientists have announced that they think we are tantalizingly close to discovering some form of extraterrestrial life.

In fact, our search tools have become so sophisticated that space researchers believe we will have gathered convincing data for the presence of alien life, most likely microbial, by 2025.

I think we’re going to have strong indications of life beyond Earth within a decade, and I think we’re going to have definitive evidence within 20 to 30 years,” NASA chief scientist Ellen Stofan said this week at a public panel discussion in Washington.

We know where to look. We know how to look. In most cases, we have the technology, and we’re on a path to implementing it.”

This optimism was promoted by recent discoveries that suggest that potentially habitable worlds are much more common than once believed.




Almost every star is now thought to host planets, and one study even suggested that those within our galaxy possess an average of two planets within the habitable range, or “Goldilocks zone,” which is the area where liquid water can exist.

But it’s not just stars that can host these regions; discoveries much closer to home suggest that even giant planets could have habitable zones, which could greatly expand scientists’ search for life.

Jupiter’s icy moon Europa, for example, has a vast and deep subsurface ocean despite residing some 400 million miles away from the sun.

The water within this ocean resists completely freezing over due to strong tidal forces resulting from Jupiter’s gravitational pull.

Jupiter is also home to another interesting satellite, Ganymede, which is also thought to possess a subsurface saltwater ocean.

Although Europa has received the most attention, Saturn’s moon Enceladus also recently became a top candidate for extraterrestrial life following the discovery of a liquid water ocean below its icy surface.

Furthermore, this satellite was also found to possess geysers that spurt out sandy plumes of water and ice, suggesting the presence of hydrothermal activity within the subsurface ocean.

And let’s not forget about Mars; this now parched and barren planet was once a watery world complete with enduring lakes, oceans and flowing rivers, some of which could have lingered long enough for life to have had a chance to evolve.

Not only that, but scientists also recently found evidence of useful nitrogen compounds, which are a crucial source of this element for life on Earth.

While our present set of powerful observatories are obviously capable of churning out exciting data on the subject, things are only set to get more exciting as technology develops.

A mission to Europa is already on the cards, for example, which NASA hopes to launch by 2022.

And before that, the agency hopes to send up their James Webb Space Telescope, which will probe the atmospheres of nearby “super-Earths,” or exoplanets with masses higher than our own planet, with the hope of identifying gases that could have been created by life forms.

Certainly, we have got a lot to look forward to in the coming years.

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Top 3 Apps For Learning A Musical Instrument On iOS

You can do just about anything on an iPhone or iPad these days, huh? Why stop at adding snaps to your Snapchat story or solving puzzles in Candy Crush?

You can teach yourself pretty easily how to play various different musical instruments and even play some of them right from your phone. What a world we live in.

Believe it or not, all three of these apps can teach you how to play guitar or piano and all of them are free to download. Perhaps you’re interested in picking up a new hobby or want an easy way to help grow your child’s love of music. There’s no harm in starting off with an app.

1. GARAGEBAND

You might recognize Apple’s $4.99 GarageBand as the go-to app for music creation and edits. Many people use it to mix and match beats, record songs and covers, and add various effects and sound enhancements.

What you probably don’t know is that it actually includes a number of powerful education tools for learning how to play instruments.

The power is in the Touch (software) instruments that come built in, so you don’t have to hook up a piano or guitar, though you can. You can learn the individual keys or strings right through your touchscreen.

2. SIMPLYPIANO

SimplyPiano is an awesome app for learning to play piano on a real instrument. Using your iOS device’s microphone, the app will listen to you play and offer feedback as you go.

You can specify where you are with experience and your goals, whether you want to learn how to play your favorite songs or improve upon your already solid skills.




The app is like a combination of short video tutorials and interactivity as you play. It teaches you the basics of the piano if you’re brand new and over time you can complete lessons, take on challenges and learn along the way. It’s great for kids and adults alike, plus SimplyPiano is free.

3. YOUSICIAN GUITAR

Yousician Guitar works very similarly to SimplyPiano except it’s aptly suited for guitars instead. It too requires that you own a guitar to use with the app. You’ll run through helpful video tutorials and then have to try some training sessions on your own.

The app will listen and report back about proper notes, chords and timing.

It’s organized into missions, songs and challenges. Missions lays out everything you need to succeed in learning guitar from mastering strings and frets all the way to acing your test on chord riffs.

If you subscribe to Yousician Premium starting at $9.99 per month, you can unlock premium songs to play with the app in the Songs section. Lastly, you can participate in challenges to play songs and compare scores with friends and other guitarists around the world.

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Here’s Why Naps Are Really Good For You, According to Science

You may be familiar with that feeling of overwhelming sleepiness during the mid-afternoon.

It’s common, occurs whether you’ve eaten lunch or not, and is caused by a natural dip in alertness from about 1 to 3pm. So, if you find yourself fighting off sleep in the middle of the day and you’re somewhere where you can have a nap, then do it.

Taking the time for a brief nap will relieve the sleepiness almost immediately and improve alertness for several hours after waking. And there are many other benefits too.




Understanding why we nap

People nap for lots of reasons, some which are:

  • to catch up on lost sleep
  • in anticipation of sleep loss to avoid feeling sleepy later on
  • for enjoyment, boredom or to pass time.

Napping is relatively common. In fact, about 50 percent of us report taking a nap at least once per week.

Napping rates are greater in countries like Greece, Brazil and Mexico that have a culture of siesta, which incorporate “quiet time” in the early afternoon for people to go home for a nap. In such countries, up to 72 percent of people will nap as often as four times per week.

The perks of napping

Naps are not only beneficial because they make us feel less sleepy and more alert, but because they improve our cognitive functioning, reaction times, short-term memory and even our mood.

Our research (not yet published) has found those who regularly nap report feeling more alert after a brief nap in the afternoon when compared to those who only nap occasionally.

How long should a nap be?

The amount of time you spend napping really depends on the time you have available, how you want the nap to work for you, and your plans for the coming night. Generally speaking, the longer a nap is, the longer you will feel rejuvenated after waking.

Long naps of one to two hours during the afternoon will mean you are less sleepy (and require less sleep) that night. This could mean it will take longer than usual to fall asleep.

If you are planning to stay up later than usual, or if taking a little longer to fall asleep at bedtime is not bothersome, time your nap for about 1.5 hours.

This is the length of a normal sleep cycle. You will experience deep sleep for about an hour or so followed by light sleep for the last half an hour.

Waking up during light sleep will leave you feeling refreshed and alert. However, waking during deep sleep will not.

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Uber Video Shows The Kind Of Crash Self-Driving Cars Are Made To Avoid

The police have released video showing the final moments before an Uber self-driving car struck and killed 49-year-old Elaine Herzberg, who was crossing the street, on Sunday night in Tempe, Arizona.

The video includes views of the human safety driver and her view of the road, and it shows Herzberg emerging from the dark just seconds before the car hits her.

And based on this evidence, it’s difficult to understand why Uber’s self-driving system—with its lidar laser sensor that sees in the dark—failed to avoid hitting Herzberg, who was slowly, steadily crossing the street, pushing a bicycle.

And if Herzberg had approached the car at a different angle, she might have confused the system’s algorithms that classify obstacles and instruct the vehicle to behave accordingly.

The situations that are more difficult is moving at odd angles to the vehicle or moving back and forth, and the vehicle has to decide, ‘Are they going into my path or are they not moving into my path?’” says Shladover.




But Herzberg and her bicycle were at a 90-degree angle to the vehicle, fully visible—and clearly heading into the car’s way.

Shladover says an obstruction, like a parked car or a tree, might also have complicated matters for the car’s sensors, and the software charged with interpreting the sensors’ data. But maps of the area show Herzberg had already crossed a shoulder and lane of road before the car struck her in the right lane.

This is one that should have been straightforward,” he says.

That means the problems could have stemmed from the sensors, the way the sensors were positioned, how the sensors’ data was created or stored, or how Uber’s software responded to that data—or a combination of all of the above.

The video also shows the safety driver, 44-year-old Rafaela Vasquez, looking down and away from the road in the moments leading up to the impact.

Uber’s drivers are charged with monitoring the technology and keeping alert, ready to take control of the vehicle at any moment. It is true that Herzberg and her bike appear suddenly from the shadows, and Vasquez may not have been able to stop the car in time to avoid hitting her.

But it’s worth asking whether Uber’s safety driver would have been ready to respond even if she had not.

This raises questions about Uber’s safety driver training. Today, potential Uber safety drivers take manual drivers tests and written assessments. They then undergo three weeks of training, first on a closed course and then on public roads.

The dynamics of the ‘operator’ are very different from that of a normal manually-driven vehicle,” says Raj Rajkumar, who researches autonomous driving at Carnegie Mellon University. “Besides identifying and fixing the technical issues, Uber must train the operators very differently.

And it raises questions about the efficacy of safety drivers in general. Can any human—even a highly trained one—be expected to pay perfect attention for hours on end, or snap out of a reverie to take control of a vehicle in an emergency?

The Tempe Police Department’s Vehicular Crimes Unit is still investigating Sunday’s incident. After its conclusion, the department will submit the case to the Maricopa County Attorney’s Office, for possible criminal charges.

An Uber spokesperson says the company is assisting authorities, and its self-driving fleets all over the country remain grounded.

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How Much Water Pressure Can The Human Body Take?

Depending on how you look at it, the human body is either one of the most vulnerable things on the planet, or one of the most resilient.

It’s true we can do amazing things — heal where we once were bleeding, attack and destroy unfriendly microbial invaders, even knit our own bones back together.

But despite our many abilities, we’re still pretty delicate when you consider the universe around us.

There’s only a tiny window of conditions in which we can thrive, and things that are rather inconsequential in the universe — a dip in oxygen, shocking cold, a flare of nuclear radiation — would mean the end of us in the blink of an eye.

But what exactly can we take? What are the limits of our survival, and what happens to our body if we cross them?

Here we explore the body’s (many) breaking points. First up: water pressure.




What is pressure?

Pressure can generally be defined as the force, per unit area, applied to the surface of something. We’re always under a certain amount of pressure, we just don’t notice.

We hear about air pressure on the weather channel, but we actually have our own pressure in air-filled spaces of our body like our lungs, stomach, and ears.

Our internal pressure is usually equal to the outside air pressure (the weight of the atmosphere pushing down on us.)

We become uncomfortable whenever we venture away from sea level; our internal pressure is no longer equal to the ambient pressure. This is why our ears hurt when we go up in a plane or when we dive too deep underwater.

Underwater Pressure

Ever wonder why we can’t just create extra-long snorkels to breathe underwater? Seems like an obvious and easy solution for breathing without an oxygen tank, but there’s a good reason this can’t work.

For every 33 feet a diver descends the weight of the water above them increases by 15 pounds per square inch.

At only a few feet below the surface, the water pressure is already too great for the muscles that expand and contract our lungs to work, making it extremely difficult for us to draw breath.

A couple feet of water pressure isn’t enough to do serious damage yet, but looking at deeper levels shows how pressure affects us a little more gradually.

At a depth of around 100 feet, the spongy tissue of the lung begins to contract, which would leave you with only a small supply of air that was inhaled at the surface.

An ancient “dive-response” is then triggered in our body, which constricts the limbs and pushes blood toward the needier heart and brain.

If you somehow got stuck in the middle of an oceanic abyss, the deepest part of the ocean, you’d have a few things to worry about.

The lack of breathable oxygen, freezing cold, and these charming creatures, to name a few, but the huge amount of water pressure pressing down on you would definitely be the immediate threat.

Since your body’s internal pressure is so much less than the ambient pressure, your lungs would not have the strength to push back against the water pressure.

At a deep enough level, the lungs would collapse completely, killing you instantly.

This is the most extreme consequence of underwater pressure, but thankfully most of us will never have to deal with ocean depths of this magnitude.

So, how deep can we go? Scientists haven’t yet determined a hard limit for how deep we can survive underwater.

There have been a few instances of divers surviving ridiculous depths (not without side effects), but most professional free divers don’t go past 400 feet deep.

The only way to test a limit would be to test on a real, live human, so obviously there are no handy studies to help us formulate an answer.

Scientists do know, however, what would happen to a diver who crossed their body’s limit. A diver could die from bleeding into the lungs, or pass out from the strain the redistribution of blood lays on the heart.

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How To Make Android And iOS Play Nicely Together

Even if you love Android, you can’t totally ignore iOS. You probably have plenty of family members or friends who use iPhones.

Or you may dabble with the other side on your own with an iPad, which isn’t a bad option considering the Android tablet space could use really use a new Nexus flagship.

As you’re probably aware, you can forget about using most Apple services on Android.

Apple Music is a rare exception, though much like iTunes on Windows, you get the feeling it will always be a second-class citizen compared to the iOS version.




So when you think of sharing music, photos, messaging, and location updates you have to go outside the walls of Cupertino.

This is where the app ecosystem comes in. Not only are there plenty of good services that work well on both Android and iOS, but they’re often better.

If you do it right, you’ll move from one screen to another, regardless of platform, with ease. And you’ll be better connected to those in your life who just can’t part with their iPhones.

Go over the top for messaging

Let’s start simple: the ski slopes will probably open up in the infernal regions before Apple ports iMessage to Android.

It’s really unfortunate, because iMessage is probably the one thing I miss the most from when I used an iPhone everyday.

Real-time typing notifications, sync to the desktop, and of course the social pressure of not being one of those dreaded green bubbles are all nice to have.

Keep tabs on everybody

Another iOS-only app that you have to live without is Find My Friends.

Again, Apple has crafted a seamless approach for keeping tabs on family members, especially helpful if you have children that aren’t very good at reporting their whereabouts.

Familonet gives a lot of additional details, such as location history, customized alerts, and it supports Android Wear (iOS users also get Apple Watch support).

Share photos with ease

Keeping a photo collection in sync, or just the act of sharing images, can be a pain when you’re trying to do this across mobile platforms.

If you have enough Google Drive storage then you can save everything at full quality, and that’s definitely the best option. The iOS app is also pretty much on par with features as the Android version.

In the end, the beauty of our current app situation is that there is a ton of choice out there to keep everything for yourself and others all in sync.

We’re in a multi-platform and multi-device world, and the services that are worth our time are going to be the ones that navigate this the best.

The hardest part is convincing iOS users to stray from Apple’s defaults, which are convenient, even if third-party apps and services are better.

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TRAPPIST-1 Planets Probably Rich In Water

Planets around the faint red star TRAPPIST-1, just 40 light-years from Earth, were first detected by the TRAPPIST-South telescope at ESO’s La Silla Observatory in 2016.

In the following year further observations from ground-based telescopes, including ESO’s Very Large Telescope and NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope, revealed that there were no fewer than seven planets in the system, each roughly the same size as the Earth.

They are named TRAPPIST-1b,c,d,e,f,g and h, with increasing distance from the central star.

Further observations have now been made, both from telescopes on the ground, including the nearly-complete SPECULOOS facility at ESO’s Paranal Observatory, and from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope and the Kepler Space Telescope.

A team of scientists led by Simon Grimm at the University of Bern in Switzerland have now applied very complex computer modelling methods to all the available data and have determined the planets’ densities with much better precision than was possible before.




Simon Grimm explains how the masses are found: “The TRAPPIST-1 planets are so close together that they interfere with each other gravitationally, so the times when they pass in front of the star shift slightly.

“These shifts depend on the planets’ masses, their distances and other orbital parameters. With a computer model, we simulate the planets’ orbits until the calculated transits agree with the observed values, and hence derive the planetary masses.”

Team member Eric Agol comments on the significance: “A goal of exoplanet studies for some time has been to probe the composition of planets that are Earth-like in size and temperature.

“The discovery of TRAPPIST-1 and the capabilities of ESO’s facilities in Chile and the NASA Spitzer Space Telescope in orbit have made this possible — giving us our first glimpse of what Earth-sized exoplanets are made of!

The measurements of the densities, when combined with models of the planets’ compositions, strongly suggest that the seven TRAPPIST-1 planets are not barren rocky worlds.

They seem to contain significant amounts of volatile material, probably water, amounting to up to 5% the planet’s mass in some cases — a huge amount; by comparison the Earth has only about 0.02% water by mass!

TRAPPIST-1b and c, the innermost planets, are likely to have rocky cores and be surrounded by atmospheres much thicker than Earth’s.

TRAPPIST-1d, meanwhile, is the lightest of the planets at about 30 percent the mass of Earth. Scientists are uncertain whether it has a large atmosphere, an ocean or an ice layer.

Scientists were surprised that TRAPPIST-1e is the only planet in the system slightly denser than Earth, suggesting that it may have a denser iron core and that it does not necessarily have a thick atmosphere, ocean or ice layer.

It is mysterious that TRAPPIST-1e appears to be so much rockier in its composition than the rest of the planets.

In terms of size, density and the amount of radiation it receives from its star, this is the planet that is most similar to Earth.

TRAPPIST-1f, g and h are far enough from the host star that water could be frozen into ice across their surfaces.

If they have thin atmospheres, they would be unlikely to contain the heavy molecules that we find on Earth, such as carbon dioxide.

Astronomers are also working hard to search for further planets around faint red stars like TRAPPIST-1. As team member Michaël Gillon explains: “This result highlights the huge interest of exploring nearby ultracool dwarf stars — like TRAPPIST-1 — for transiting terrestrial planets.

“This is exactly the goal of SPECULOOS, our new exoplanet search that is about to start operations at ESO’s Paranal Observatory in Chile.

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