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3D-Printed Chains of Ice And The Robot-Assisted Igloos Of The Future

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A small but dedicated team led by Pieter Sijpkes and Jorge Angeles has been spear-heading the experimental use of ice at the university.

Creating everything from 3D-printed chains to what they describe as “commercial and industrial part modeling” used in fabrication, including full-scale construction tests for “the ice-tourism industry.”

For instance,” they explain, “small-scale ice models represent economical alternatives to intricate 3D models of architectural objects, be they scale models of buildings, site models, or building details.




Why prototype in plastic, in other words, when you can simply use the renewable, re-meltable, and re-freezable resource of freshwater?

Awesomely, like something out of the X-Men, Sijpkes and Angeles add that “casting techniques are being investigated in order to produce high-quality metal copies from ice originals.”

Here’s how the printing is done:

The idea is that you deposit a very thin bead of water onto your build surface is the same way that would extrude plastic.”

“Once a layer has been laid down there would be a delay of a few minutes while it freezes in the cold build chamber.”

“Once frozen, the next layer is deposited and the process repeats. By keeping the beads of water only a few millimeters in size surface tension alone should be enough to keep them in place.”

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Pass it on: Popular Science

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