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Five Reasons We Know The Earth Isn’t Flat

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The curvature of the Earth is visible in this 2014 photo, which ESA astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti snapped from the International Space Station.

Most of the human population is pretty sure the Earth is round.

Neil deGrasse Tyson doesn’t have to take to Twitter to confirm it, because every kind of investigation that we can do shows that the blue marble we live on is indeed marble-shaped.

Here are 5 ways we know the Earth is round, and some you can prove yourself!




1. You Don’t Weigh Less at the Horizon

While flat-earthers will contend that there is no such thing as gravity, this force unites the entire universe. It’s everything from what makes the numbers jump on a bathroom scale to the reason why planets and stars form.

It uniformly pulls everyone on the surface of Earth toward our planet’s center of mass. That’s why you’ll weigh the same in Los Angeles as you will in Jakarta.

If the Earth was flat, gravity would no longer pull everyone the same way.

If the flat Earth would be something like a disk, those at the edge of the disk would be pulled relatively sideways, while those at the center of the plate would be pulled straight down.

The difference would change your weight enough to confuse a bathroom scale. Considering that humans have been to every landmass on Earth without celebrating sudden lightness, we can rule out a flat planet.

2. You Don’t Fall Off The Planet

Where is the edge of the world according to flat-earthers? The answer changes, but it usually involves some impenetrable barrier at said edge that prevents people from going past or falling off.

Global conspiracies apparently prevent people from investigating these boundaries.

Where is the edge of the world according to flat-earthers? The answer changes, but it usually involves some impenetrable barrier at said edge that prevents people from going past or falling off.

Global conspiracies apparently prevent people from investigating these boundaries.

3. You Don’t Always See the Same Constellations

Hit up a friend in Australia and ask them what constellations they can see at night. Now tell them which ones pepper your patch of darkness.

They won’t be the same. Because the Earth is a shape other than a flat disk, when looking into the night sky the Earth itself can block your view.

If the flat Earth theory were true, everyone should be able to see the same constellations all the time, as if we all were staring up from the same section of summer grass.

4. We’ve Seen Earth From Space, From Multiple Angles

This is “Earthrise,” arguably the most famous photo ever taken. It was beamed back to us by the astronauts on the Apollo 8 mission on Christmas Eve, 1968.

It shows the Earth as a perfect (from that vantage point at least) azure orb speckled with land and clouds, and us.

It’s true that the Earth could be a disk in this photo, and the astronauts were seeing it face-on, making it appear spherical.

5. Timezones Exist

To make the seasons work with a flat Earth, advocates claim that the Sun orbits in a circle above our disk, like a tetherball on an invisible string.

But timezones exist. Try calling someone in China right now and convincing them that you are experiencing the same time of day (and then apologize).

A flat Earth can’t account for how some parts of the planet are provably in darkness while other parts are bathed in light.

the Earth is not flat. From what we know of the universe, it can’t be. A conspiracy could never be big enough to deny us our planet’s true shape.

We live on a pale blue dot, believe it or not. A dot from every angle makes a sphere, who you been listening to, this is what you should hear.

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Pass it on: Popular Science

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