Tag: answers with joe

5 Ways The World Could End – And How We Can Survive It (Feat. Isaac Arthur)

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Today, we’re discussing 5 plausible ways that the world could end, and I’m thrilled to be doing this as a 2-part collaboration with the one and only Isaac Arthur. Check out his video here:

Obviously there are many end-of-the-world scenarios out there, but for the purposes of these videos, we chose to focus on these five:

Grey Goo/Artificial Intelligence
Runaway Greenhouse Effect (Global Warming)
Comet or Asteroid Impact
Gamma Ray Burst
Death Of The Sun

From the self-replicating nanobots of John Von Neumann and K Eric Drexler to the gamma ray burst that caused the Ordovician Extinction, and how the death of Venus may signal our own future on Earth, our planet faces a multitude of threats that could end life as we know it.

Meet Your Future Robot Overlords

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Robots no longer live in science fiction. They’re all around us. Right now. Let’s look at the current most advanced robots and see where things might go in the future.

From their first mention in a Czech play to Elon Musk’s “alien dreadnought” automated factory, robots have been slowly becoming a huge part of our lives.

The types of robots include:
Industrial/Warehouse Robots
Service/Companion Robots
Military Robots
Exploratory Robots

Industrial robots include AMRs, which automate products around a warehouse floor.

Service and Companion robots include Asimo from Honda, Romeo and Pepper from SoftRobotics, and Milo, a robot for autistic kids.

Military Robots are usually funded by DARPA and include the Atlas and Spotmini from Boston Dynamics

Exploratory robots include NASA space probes including the Curiosity Rover.

How NASA Is Using Ancient Art To Find Alien Life

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The Starshade Space Probe is part of the New Worlds mission in which NASA is going to launch a huge shade to block out the light from stars so that we could possibly see Earth-like rocky planets.

In order to get the star shade into space, they’re employing the ancient art of origami to incredible effect.

Check out Robert Salazar’s blog detailing the process of designing the shade:

Starshade: An Origami Odyssey

Fusion Energy Is Coming. No, Really.

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Fusion energy has been about 20 years away for over 60 years now. It’s become something of a running joke at this point. But new developments over the last 5-10 years suggest that this time, it could finally be within our reach.

Pamela Newenham Of GirlCrew On Actual Social Networking

Pamela Newenham is the co-founder of GirlCrew, a social media app designed to help women connect in the real world. Here we talk about how GirlCrew came to be (through Tinder of all places), the importance of connecting with people face-to-face, and the power and perils of being an entrepreneur.

Find more about GirlCrew here: https://www.girlcrew.com/

Chimpanzees Aren’t Super Strong But Their Muscles Are More Powerful Than A Human’s

Since the 1920’s, some researchers and studies have suggested that chimps are ‘super strong’ compared to humans. These past studies implied that chimps’ muscle fibers, the cells that make up muscles are superior to humans’.

But a new study has found that contrary to this belief, a chimp muscles’ power output is just about 1.35 times higher than human muscle of similar size.

A difference the researchers call ‘modest‘ compared with historical, popular accounts of chimp ‘super strength’ being many times stronger than humans.




chimp

If the long-standing, assumption about chimpanzee’s exceptional strength was true, it ‘would indicate a significant and previously unappreciated evolutionary shift in the force and/or power-producing capabilities of skeletal muscle’ in either chimps or humans, whose lines diverged about 7 or 8 million years ago.

The authors of the study concluded that, contrary to some long-standing hypotheses, evolution has not altered the basic force, velocity or power-producing capabilities of skeletal muscle cells to induce the marked differences between chimpanzees and humans in walking, running, climbing and throwing capabilities.

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Pass it on: New Scientist

This Mad Inventor Creates A Morning Breakfast Machine

sunday breakfast machine

This is the ‘Sunday Morning Breakfast Machine’ and it is, quite simply, the future of hangovers.

With just one push of a button it will toast your bread, make you the perfect cup of breakfast tea and then serve you a perfectly boiled egg.




Creative Peter Browne, 69, spent about 1,000 hours building the innovative contraption with pal Mervyn Huggett.  Retired airline pilot and silversmith Peter says he’s been coming up with inventions his entire life, but this is his pride and joy.

He said: “It took a total of 1,000 hours. It was hard work for three months but it was worth it.”

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Pass it on: Popular Science

This Mechanical Instructor Can Guide And Teach Anyone How To Dance

waltz robot

Researchers have developed a waltzing robot that can teach people how to dance. This robot can take the lead, allowing the robot to teach dance sequences.

While the system has been developed for dancing, it could also have other applications including physical rehabilitation and sports training.

The system adjusts its difficulty mode based on the user’s number of previous practices and performance history.




The bot, which stands 1.8 meters tall (5 feet 9 inches), was designed by researchers at Tohoku University in Japan.

According to the authors of the study, the bot its designed for contact with adults with heights ranging from 1.5 meters (4 feet 9 inches) to 1.9 meters (6 feet two inches) meters tall.

It has a force sensor and two laser rangefinders to track movements, which are compared against motion-capture data originally recorded from professional dancers.

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Pass it on: New Scientist