Everything Is Memory

Today we go a little deeper and talk about the mystery of memory.
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From Plato’s Allegory of the Cave to The Matrix, we’ve believed that reality is not exactly what we experience. Can that be because of the fact that we are all living in our own simulations – the conscious experience that our brain creates.

And this imagined reality creates the beliefs that we cling to and create our worldview around.

US Schools Start WAY Too Early

From lower test scores to depression and even traffic deaths, the evidence is piling up that early school start times are bad for teenagers. So why do schools in the US start so early?

Teens have different physiological needs when it comes to sleep, due to their changing bodies and the energy needs that go along with it. Because of this, multiple health agencies including the Centers for Disease Control, The National Sleep Foundation, The American Academy of Sleep Medicine, American Academy of Pediatrics, and the American Medical Association have pushed for later start times – 8:30am or later.

But for various reasons (usually money) only 1 in 5 schools actually start at the recommended time.

The Best (And Worst) Invention Of All Time

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Plastic is a surprisingly recent invention, and it’s become completely ubiquitous in our society. It’s solved a ton of problems and made our way of life possible. It also might be killing us.

The Population Explosion – Was Thanos Right?

Get two months of Skillshare for free: https://skl.sh/joescott In Avengers: Infinity War, the Mad Titan Thanos wants to wipe out half of all life in the universe as a way to save it from overpopulation. This is clearly evil. But is he right?

The first person to sound the alarm about overpopulation was Thomas Malthus in 1798. His belief that overpopulation will lead to unimaginable suffering became known as a Malthusian Catastrophe.

Many years later, Paul Ehrlich wrote about overpopulation in his book The Population Bomb, and predicted that the 70s and 80s would be times of famine and suffering around the world.

This didn’t quite pan out. Julian Simon, an economist, challenged Erlich to a bet to see if commodities went down over time. They did.

And Erlich lost the bet. Today we know that as society develops, the birth rate goes down, meaning that the population will level out eventually.

But we still need to evolve our lifestyles to be more sustainable if the Earth is going to be able to manage over 10 billion people.

Ion Drives And Electric Propulsion

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Ion drives are a type of propulsion that provides a very small amount of force over a very long period of time, giving it the ability to build up to incredibly fast speeds.

 

5 Ways The World Could End – And How We Can Survive It (Feat. Isaac Arthur)

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Today, we’re discussing 5 plausible ways that the world could end, and I’m thrilled to be doing this as a 2-part collaboration with the one and only Isaac Arthur. Check out his video here:

Obviously there are many end-of-the-world scenarios out there, but for the purposes of these videos, we chose to focus on these five:

Grey Goo/Artificial Intelligence
Runaway Greenhouse Effect (Global Warming)
Comet or Asteroid Impact
Gamma Ray Burst
Death Of The Sun

From the self-replicating nanobots of John Von Neumann and K Eric Drexler to the gamma ray burst that caused the Ordovician Extinction, and how the death of Venus may signal our own future on Earth, our planet faces a multitude of threats that could end life as we know it.

This Isn’t The End Of Printed Photos, It’s The Golden Age

As a society, we now produce more photographs than ever before, and the total number is becoming difficult to fathom. This year, it is estimated that billions of humans armed with smartphones will take some 1.2 trillion pictures.

Many of them will be shared on social media, but many more will simply be forgotten. A few good selfies will flash before your eyes as you swipe left or right on them, late some Friday night.

But hardly any will make the transition into the physical world, bits becoming blots of ink that coalesce into an image on a piece of paper, canvas, wood, or metal — a print.

The reasons for this are rational, and there’s no point fighting progress, but nor should we ignore the value of a print. We may no longer print every photo by default, but this can actually be a good thing for printing.

It is now about quality rather than quantity, and the pictures we choose to print deserve the best treatment.

Honestly, there has never been a better time to print than now, thanks to technological advances in both digital cameras and inkjet printers.

If you haven’t yet tried your hand at photo printing, you owe it to yourself to do so, even if you’re just a casual photographer.




Print isn’t dead — it’s better than ever

It’s a common refrain in the digital age, and not just in reference to photography. Print is dead, or at least dying, right? In truth, a certain type of print has certainly declined, but this isn’t a tragedy.

Prints used to be the only way we had to view our photos. We’d drop our film off at the drugstore and pick it up 24 hours later not because it was a better system, but because it was all we had.

We tend to romanticize the print, but when printing was the norm, many photos were still lost and forgotten (and some were found again).

Most were destined for photo albums or shoeboxes that would sit around and collect dust until moving day. If fewer were forgotten, it was because fewer were made.

Far fewer, in fact — in 2000, Kodak announced 80 billion pictures had been taken that year.

Sure, that sounds like a lot (it was a new milestone at the time), but for those who think of such large numbers as vague clouds of zeros, consider that 80 billion is still 1.12 trillion shy of 2017’s 1.2 trillion photos.

For the mathematically disinclined, let’s put it another way: Subtracting the total number of photos made in the year 2000 from those made in 2017 would have no effect on the number of shirtless mirror selfies posted by lonely men on Tinder.

With so many photos being taken, it’s no wonder so relatively few are being printed. Every print costs money, after all, so of course people aren’t going to print 1.3 trillion photos.

What’s more, the point of printing (often the point of taking a photo in the first place) was to share your memory with someone else.

Now that we don’t need prints to do that, it makes sense that people are choosing not to spend money on them, especially when electronically sharing images also happens to be much more convenient.

But people still love prints. Even the “low end” of printing is alive and well as instant photography has seen a huge resurgence in recent years.

Polaroid Originals has built an entire brand around it, and Fujifilm Instax cameras and film packs made up six of the top ten best selling photography products on Amazon last holiday season.

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