Tag: ADHD

Are Fidget Toys Legitimately Good For Your Brain?

Fidget” isn’t exactly a word with the most positive of connotations. For many of us, it recalls veiled childhood threats of “stop fidgeting or,” and then the promised removal of something we value more highly than fidgeting.

Type “stop” into Google’s search box and “stop fidget” is one of the first recommendations its autocomplete feature presents you with.

But fidgeting, like beloved 1990s TV properties, is making a comeback.

Last year, the creators of Fidget Cube a Kickstarter desk toy allowing users to click, roll, flip, glide, spin and assorted fidgety verbs set out to raise $15,000 to make their product a reality.

They wound up raking in $6,465,690 from 154,926 backers.

Fidget Cube has inevitably been followed by a number of other crowdfunding campaigns designed to appeal to the twitchy fingers of those who supported it.




One was a fidget pen called Think Ink, which combines a titanium pen exterior with a number of tactile elements for distracted fingers to play with. It made more than quadruple its funding target.

I made this for my daughter,” co-founder Kent Lyon said.

She had just started a new job, which she nervous about, and started noticing that she was fidgeting a whole lot. Whether it was clicking her pen or playing with her hair, she found that she couldn’t stop doing something with her hands.” Lyon gave Think Ink the subtitle “Fidget to focus.

But is this really a thing — or is the idea that a distracting toy can actually help us just a pseudoscientific marketing ploy?

It’s tempting to bust out the klaxons at the breaking news that a fidget toy purveyor thinks fidget toys increase productivity.

However, it just may be correct.

Research has shown that even small repetitive activities can increase the levels of neurotransmitters in the brain in a way that increases our ability to focus and pay attention.

Even if the fidget you are carrying out involves minimal concentration fidgeting with a pen, chewing gum, or doodling on a piece of paper this type of multitasking can positively impact the outcome of a particular task.

This is especially noticeable when dealing with children with ADHD, as Purdue University professor Sydney Zentall has noted in her work.

According to Zentall, while failure to stay on task can reduce work speed and production, there is no evidence that most “distractions” increase errors among children with ADHD.

Surprisingly, she said, these kind of fidget distractions “may actually help the child perform in the classroom, especially when tasks are long and tedious.

That is, off-task looking may provide ‘doses’ of environmental stimulation that the child needs.

There is even evidence that fidgeting can have a positive impact on people’s physical health.

Examinations regarding the physical benefits of fidgeting are relatively few and far between, but a 2008 study tracked daily movements for a group of slim and overweight women, and discovered that the slimmer group tended to fidget more.

If the obese women adopted the activity patterns of the lean women,” the authors of the study noted, they might burn an extra 300 calories per day.

Sure, you’re never going to match a five-mile run by playing with your Fidget Cube, but the findings suggest that every little bit helps.

Ultimately, we’re still still a long way from the makers of fidget-focused desk toys being able to make explicit medical claims for their devices — but it seems that there is real scientific evidence to suggest that fidgeting has an important role to play in our lives.

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Pass it on: New Scientist

A Ball And Disc Spinning Magnetic Fidget Toy

orbiter

Fidget toys are certainly becoming quite prevalent everywhere within the last year.

Be it the fidget cube, fidget pens, fidget rings, or even a moon gravity simulating fidget toy, everyone seems to need to fill their busy hands with something to play with while they think, work, or just something to calm that ADHD.




This newest installment of a fidget toy consists simply of a magnetic disc and a metallic ball. Known as the Orbiter, the unique fidget toy allows you to do a multitude of things with it, including letting you spin the metal ball around the edges of the disc super quickly, spinning it like a top, a hand spinner, and more.

orbiter

By default the metallic ball rests in the depression of the base. But once you’re ready to start using it just flip it out of the base with your finger and start fidgeting.

The Orbiter fidget toy is super small, as it easily can be placed in your pocket when not in use, then just slip it out when those fidget cravings come along.

With just a few minutes of practice you can become a master Orbiter user to help relieve stress and increase your focus.

orbiter

Your purchase includes 1 orbiter, 1 metallic ball, and a carrying pouch, all packaged within a high quality gift box.

The device is made using grade 5 titanium and powerful neodymium magnets, weighs well under 2 oz, and can easily be stored in a pocket, purse, or just right on the front of your desk at work.

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Pass it on: Popular Science