Tag: apps

How To Unsend Messages You’ve Sent in Your Top Apps

Whether it’s a typo, automatic spell check, or wrong video, most of us have experienced the situation where we can’t unsend incorrect messages on apps.

You might be talking with your boss, mom, or friend, when you realize that your message is messed up. If you’re already thinking “no turning back now,” don’t sweat it.

There are actually ways to navigate tech (yes, no kidding), so you can save yourself from embarrassing message mistakes.

Facebook Messenger

Version 191 of Facebook Messenger in the Apple App Store comes with all the tech fixings, including the capability to send voice messages, chat with businesses, and show message reactions with stickers.

Currently, you can only remove messages you send on your own device, but that will change soon.

According to Facebook Messenger, there are new features on the way, including the option to remove a message from a chat thread after you send it.




For example, if you accidentally send incorrect information or message the wrong thread, you can fix it by removing the message up to 10 minutes after you sent it.

Instagram

Instagram might be the easiest app for message troubleshooting. Removing a previously sent message only takes three steps: Tap the arrow on your Instagram feed, choose the conversation to find the message you would like to unsend, then tap and hold the message to select “unsend.”

Your bad message will disappear from your conversation feed in a pinch. The one downside though is people might see your message error before your correct it, so be mindful of that when you’re using the app.

WhatsApp

WhatsApp makes it easy to remove a bad message. On the app, you can delete messages for everyone in a few easy steps.

To delete messages you’ve sent in an individual chat or group, open the app, go to the chat with the message mistake, tap and hold the message, and then tap “delete” at the top of the screen.

A benefit of this feature is that you have up to 60 minutes to delete previously sent messages, but your recipients might see your message before it’s deleted or if you can’t remove it right away.

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Pass it on: Popular Science

Alternative Android Browsers That Beat Chrome at Its Own Game

Web browsers are one of the most important apps on any device. Having the right features and performance while browsing the web can literally change your entire experience.

Finding the right one can be difficult because there are so many options and the face of the web is changing all the time.

Let’s take a look at the best Android browsers of 2018 (so far)! You can also click here to see the best web browsers on most platforms!




Brave Browser

Brave Browser is one of the newer Android browsers. It came out in 2016 and has a variety of features. There is an ad blocker built-in.

Additionally, it can block third party cookies, block scripts, and it has HTTPS everywhere. Included is per-site settings just in case you need that.

It also boasts optimizations for speed and battery life improvements. You can even keep track of all the stuff that it blocks. In real world use, it is highly functional and even occasionally fun to use.

It also has most of the basic features like bookmarks, history, and a privacy (incognito) mode. The app is entirely free with no in-app purchases or ads.

Dolphin Browser

Dolphin Browser has seen a lot of success on Androidy. It has a decent set of features as well. That includes theming, flash support, ad-block, incognito mode, and some tertiary features like gesture controls.

There is also add-on and extension support if you need that. A lot of people swear by Dolphin Browser. It covers most of the bases and that’s more than enough to rank it among the best.

It’s definitely one of the best Android browsers.

Ecosia Browser

Ecosia is an environmentally friendly mobile web browser. It features all of the usual stuff like bookmarks, multiple tabs, a private browsing mode, and downloads.

It pulls from Chromium’s open source project. Thus, it looks and feels a bit like Chrome as well. The big draw here is the cause. The browser donates up to 80% of its profits to plant trees.

That isn’t a browser feature, but it’s definitely nice. This one is good for those who don’t need to browse the web often, but still want something that works well. The trees thing is a bonus. It’s also free.

Flynx Browser

Flynx by InfiKen Labs has come a long way since its inception. This unique browser works in a floating window as opposed to a full screen mode.

This allows for quick web browsing. It also doesn’t force you to leave the app you’re currently using.

When you click links, they open a little bubble on the side of the screen and the page will load in the background until you decide to click the bubble to read it yourself.

It also comes with a few other features, such as night mode. It’s something different in the Android browsers space.

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Send & Receive SMS on Computer with This App!

Forget messaging apps like WhatsApp, Line and Viber, sending and receiving free text messages should not and is no longer restricted to smartphones only.

If you’re looking for a cross-platform iMessage-like service, this post is for you.

Today, we’re going to introduce to you a powerful cross-platform messaging app – mysms, which allows you to send and receive free text messages to other mysms users right from your desktop computer, regardless of it being a Mac or Windows.

Mysms may eventually be the only messaging app you’ll ever need on your smartphone.




Mysms Android & iOS App

To begin using mysms, get it on your smartphone first.

  1. Download and install mysms messenger app on your smartphones, iOS or Android.
  2. Register and activate your phone number by keying in your phone number and password for desktop and web access.

That’s it! Now let’s have a look how mysms Messenger works on different platforms.

Mysms on Smartphone

Mysms works like any other messaging app for smartphones: both sender and recipient must have mysms installed to start texting for free.

Then, they can start sending all sorts of messages, files, images, videos or even word documents.

Mysms on Computer

To send messages straight from your Mac or PC, just get mysms installed on your computer. Best of all, your messages will always stay in sync, no matter which device you’re using.

For Android users, you can even use mysms to send SMS via your network service provider, charges will apply.

If you want the flexibility to be in contact with anyone on the go via smartphone yet still have the comfort of sending messages from your computer, all for free, give mysms a shot.

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3 Self-Destructing Messaging Apps Adults Need to Know

Let’s face the facts: most kids don’t spend a whole lot of time on Facebook and Twitter anymore. We know this because people don’t want their information shared with the entire world.

Self-destructing messaging apps with end-to-end encryption are taking over; these are apps that automatically destruct messages when the receiver reads them and/or sets a limit for how long the receiver can see a message before it gets deleted.

Both kids and young adults use them to prevent certain people (i.e. parents, and future employers, etc.) from seeing things in their chat histories.




These apps are dangerous in their own ways. Some of them aren’t as private as they say they are, while others might be too powerful for their own good.

We chose the 6 that give you the most variety in their usage and the ones we can all learn from the most.

So without any further ado, here are 6 self-destructing messaging apps your kid might have on their phone.

1. Snapchat

We’ve all heard of Snapchat. (It is the ultimate self-destructing messaging app.)

Snapchat is one of the most popular social media platforms in the world and is by far the most well-known self-destructing messaging app out there.

It’s so well-liked within the younger generations that, in 2016, Snapchat surpassed Facebook’s number of video views per day (10 billion vs. 8 billion).

It attained its popularity once people learned they had the option to share videos and photos in a ‘safe’ online environment with all kinds of lenses and face effects. You can set timers for these photos and videos to self-destruct once the person received it.

This allows teens and young adults to share goofy or embarrassing photos without the risk of them going public.

2. Telegram

In a nutshell, Telegram is WhatsApp with the ability to self-destruct messages.

There are a number of cool features you can use in the app. Its features includes a Secret chats section. This part of the app includes a self-destruct timer, which basically gives recipients a limited amount of time to read the message.

To use the timer, click the three-dotted button in a secret chat and tap ‘Set self-destruct timer.’ All the message you send afterwards will be received and self-destructed in that amount of time once the recipient opens the message.

3. Wickr

Wickr is a private messenger worth discussing… for good reason.

In one of their YouTube videos, they mention how end-to-end encryption is important, but it doesn’t tell the full story.

The real challenge is to distribute the user’s encryption key securely; an encryption key is what turns the data in your text message into an unreadable text, making it impossible for the human brain to understand.

Wickr has not one, not two, but five different encryption keys for every message you send.

It goes above and beyond limits by not only encrypting the message, but by adding more layers so that the sender knows that the recipient is the only person to decrypt the message.

In cryptography, this is called perfect forward secrecy. No one will be able to surveil the messages you send: not the FBI, not the NSA, not even Wickr themselves!

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Pass it on: Popular Science

How To Find Out Everything Facebook Knows About You

If you use Facebook, then you know the deal.

Facebook is free to use and fun, and sometimes necessary if you belong to groups that use it to communicate with their members.

But in exchange for that service, you have allowed it to track your activity so that advertisers can find you, hopefully to show you stuff you’ll want to buy.

In other words: you can’t opt out of ads on Facebook without opting out of Facebook itself.

But there’s still a lot you can do to control the ads you see.




And there’s also stuff you can do to stop Facebook from watching what you do on the rest of the internet in service of its advertisers.

Besides all the usual arguments about privacy, there is another good reason to figure out what Facebook knows about you and participate in that.

It shows you ads based on what it thinks you like. The better it does this, the more likely you are going to see ads on things that truly interest you.

Facebook has three ways to figure you out.

1. What you tell it directly (name, age, marital status, parental status, where you live, work, went to school, etc.).

2. What you do while you are on Facebook, including stuff you’ve “liked,” groups you joined, photos and links you’ve shared, things you click on.

3. What you do on the rest of the internet outside of Facebook such as websites you visit.

Many sites track this information via cookies and Facebook reads those cookies and uses that information to serve up ads both on its site and on other websites, it says.

It’s easy to see the things you’ve directly shared with Facebook on your Timeline profile page. But to see a fully tally of what Facebook thinks you like, you need to find a tool called Ad Preferences.

This tool is not easy to find. Locate it by using the controls Facebook has embedded into the ads themselves.

Head to your Facebook news feed.

Hover your mouse over any ad you see in the right-hand column and look for the little “x” to appear in the corner of the add. Click on it.

You can make Facebook stop tracking you on the internet.

Facebook does watch what you do outside of Facebook to show you ads.

For example, if you visit travel websites, you might then see ads on Facebook for hotel deals. We call this online interest-based advertising,” it explains.

You can tell it to stop showing you ads based on you do on the internet. Click on the lock icon in the blue bar. Then click on “Ads” in the left column, then choose “Off.”

This will not stop Facebook from showing you just as many ads, but it won’t be using your web activity for them.

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5 Creativity Apps To Inspire Kids

Unleash your child’s creativity and imagination with these inspiring apps.

From arranging fruit to make faces to blowing an ink spot into a whimsical monster, this list is full of apps that will spark your kids’ creativity.

These apps will tickle your kids’ imaginations and encourage them to think outside the box.




1. Faces iMake – Right Brain Creativity

A fanciful and fun tool for creating faces out of everyday objects including food, toys, tools, and more.

Kids create faces using unusual collage materials, such as candy, toys, fruit, musical instruments, and more to make fanciful art.

2. MoMA Art Lab

Kids learn about modern art by playing with this unique set of art tools.

They can create their own artwork or follow step-by-step projects based on famous pieces of modern art during which they can add their own unique flair.

3. The DAILY MONSTER Monster Maker

Splat! An ink spot jiggles, hoping your creativity will turn it into a world-class monster.

This app provides inspiration to draw monsters by starting with a ink splat on the page. From there, kids add whimsical body parts by selecting and dragging them from a file labeled “Parts.”

4. Toontastic

Ready, Set, Action! With this set of intuitive digital tools, your kids will be creating and directing their own cartoons.

This app provides kids with a set of digital tools to create their own cartoons.

They choose their setting, add characters, move those characters around in the setting to create animation as they provide the voices, add music, and — Voila! they’re done!

5. Petting Zoo – Animal Animations

21 animals await your touching. Their responses to your touch, tap, or swipe are magical, endearing, and hilarious.

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How To Track App Store Sales And iTunes Price Drops

Who doesn’t like App Store sales — or even better, sales on iTunes movies and music?

A few months ago I stumbled on an app called CheapCharts and I’ve been using it ever since to monitor App Store sales on apps I want to keep an eye on.

Aside from App Store sales, CheapCharts can also monitor sales across pretty much every other category including music, movies, books, and TV shows. CheapCharts is completely free to download and use.

Once you have CheapCharts installed, you can instantly launch it and start browsing through current apps and games that are on sale, or you can take things one step further.




How to track App Store sales and iTunes price drops with CheapCharts

  1. Launch the CheapCharts app and tap on the menu icon in the upper left hand corner.
  2. Tap on the search button.
  3. Type in an app, game, song, book, movie or TV show you want to track price drops for and search for it.
  4. Find it in the results and tap on its name.
  5. Tap on the Add to Wishlist option towards the top.
  6. The first time you do this you’ll be asked if you want to allow CheapCharts to send you notifications of price drops, choose Activate.

That’s pretty much it. Any apps you add to your wishlist, you’ll get a push notification every time the price changes. I use this frequently for movies that are new releases.

While they’re typically expensive right when they come out, they tend to drop in price fairly quickly.

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How And Why To Turn Off Word Prediction On Your Phone

Autocorrect has made our lives so much easier — never again will we suffer the humiliation of sending a typo to a friend or making a grammatical error in an email to a colleague.

Except, that’s not true. If anything, autocorrect has made texts and emails sent from mobile devices even more embarrassing.

A cursory search through Google will reveal a spectacular array of autocorrect fails and cringe-worthy messages, all caused by our supposed life-saver.

Frustratingly, sometimes autocorrect can appear like an untameable beast. It stubbornly corrects words that it clearly shouldn’t, wreaks havoc on capitalization, and frequently refuses to let you type what you want.

So, what can you do? We investigate.




Turn Off Autocorrect

The simplest and most effective way of beating your autocorrect is to just switch it off. It might be heavy handed approach, but it’s sure to stop you accidentally telling partner that you’re splitting up with them.

The method is more or less the same on all versions of Android, but might vary slightly depending the exact device you have.

The method detailed below works for Google’s stock keyboard on a Nexus 5, but you can easily adapt it to your own needs.

You have two ways to access the relevant menu.

Either head to Settings > Language & input > Google Keyboard, or long-press the comma (,) button when using your keyboard, choose the gear icon that pops up, then select “Google Keyboard Settings”.

Once you’ve arrived at the correct menu you need to tap “Text correction”.

You’ll then be presented with a long list of options — all of which are useful for someone who wants to tweak their autocorrect.

Let’s take a closer look.

The Options

Before you disable autocorrect completely, it’s important to understand that the Google default keyboard comes with differing levels of severity.

If you’re having real difficulty with the feature, it’s possible you have it set to “Very aggressive” or “Aggressive”. Modest should be adequate for most people.

To check which severity level you are using, and to disable the function all together, you need to choose “Auto-correction” from the list.

You’ll then see the three levels of correction along with a way to turn it off completely.

If you are set to moderate and you’re still having issues, it’s worth exploring a couple of the other settings in the menu before taking the nuclear option.

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Twitter Is Killing Its Twitter For Mac Desktop Client

On Friday, Twitter announced that it would abandon its lesser-loved Mac app, directing users to Twitter.com instead.

The company declared that it will refocus its efforts on “a great Twitter experience that’s consistent across platforms” rather than continuing development for Twitter for Mac, a message that doesn’t sound great for TweetDeck lovers.

The Twitter for Mac app no longer lives in the Mac App Store, though its one and a half star rating lives on in the hearts and minds of its few tenacious users, maybe.




Over the years, Twitter has often seen its own official app eclipsed by slicker, more feature-rich third-party clients, which it sometimes buys up.

Twitter bought the software that evolved into Twitter for Mac (formerly known as Tweetie for Mac) back in 2010, though it’s largely believed to have languished following the acquisition.

Many Twitter users are expressing their concerns that the company could similarly sunset TweetDeck, a well-loved client with multi-column organization, list-making tools and robust notifications that the company acquired for $40 million back in 2011.

For a normal company, ending a product that everyone feels pretty good about wouldn’t be a likely potential outcome, but Twitter isn’t exactly known for making choices in lockstep with the desires of its opinionated user base.

While most people aren’t likely to mourn the passing of Twitter for Mac, the choice does highlight the gaping hole where a solid multi-platform client should go.

Considering its resources and the lessons the company should have learned from unnecessary bickering with its development community over the years, it doesn’t seem like a big ask.

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5 Niche Social Networks To Use Instead Of Facebook

Social media takes up a massive chunk of the time we spend online, especially on our smartphones. But sometimes, the most popular social networks out there just don’t quite offer what we’re looking for.

That’s where these alternative social media networks and apps come in.

They’re places where you can meet more like-minded people and post about topics you don’t want to post on Facebook (such as fitness, or habit building).

They’re places you can continue to post updates about certain areas of your life without your current friends and family always being notified about them.




1. PumpUp (For Health and Fitness)

PumpUp is a health and fitness app used by millions, which hails to be “the world’s most positive fitness community.” There are other social media apps for fitness enthusiasts, but this is the gold standard.

It’s a fantastic place to post updates about your latest workouts, receive props from community members, and see the inspiring progress of other users too.

2. Trover (For Travel)

If you love to travel, it’s all too easy to lose track of time scrolling through the various feeds on Trover. And what’s more: this isn’t just a travel-guide app.

It’s an app overflowing with people who are visiting incredible places, sharing what they find along the way.

If you’re looking for travel inspiration, there’s no shortage of users posting images of, and tips for, the places they’ve been. It’s here that you’ll quickly come away with a terrifyingly long list of places you just have to visit.

And if you’re looking for things to do wherever you’re headed next, just search a location. You’ll soon find a ton of alternative attractions and sights that other users have found at that locale.

Often, these are things you’d be hard-pressed to find in any guidebook, making Trover a seriously valuable app for any intrepid traveler.

3. Discord (For Gamers)

Discord is an app aiming “to bring people together around games.” This is a free, cross-platform app offering impressive text and voice chat features to 14 million gamers each day.

The layout is easy to understand, and functions similarly to Slack, with chats organized by channels. You can join and customize these however you like.

Text chats act as basic chat rooms, where you can debate with other users until your heart’s content. And when it comes to gaming, setting up a server only takes a few clicks.

4. Letterboxd (For Movie Buffs)

Letterboxd is a “social network for sharing your taste in film” that’s become incredibly popular the past few years.

With an account, you can keep a film diary to rate and review movies as you work your way through your movies-to-watch list.

Keep track of what your friends, connections, and favorite writers are watching. Create your own to-watch list. Join discussions about your favorite movies.

5. Huggle (For Real-Life Friends)

Huggle is a relatively new friendship-making app (also used for dating) that helps you connect with people not based on what they look like, but rather on your location and common interests.

It may sound a little weird at first, but if you’re new to a city and struggling to make real-life friends, Huggle could be your answer.

The app works by automatically checking you into places you visit (e.g. coffee shops). If any other user has also checked into one or more of those places, you can see a limited version of their profile.

You then decide whether you want to start a conversation with them, knowing with more confidence whether they share your interests.

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