Tag: nintendo

Microsoft Xbox At E3 2018: New Console And Games Coming

Microsoft’s got a new Halo for you.

The hit Xbox action series starring the superhuman Master Chief in his latest adventure to save the galaxy was teased Sunday during the company’s press conference here at the Electronic Entertainment Expo.

Phil Spencer, Microsoft’s head of Xbox, said it will be the character’s “greatest adventure” yet, though the company didn’t say much more than that, nor when it will be released.

The game will be called Halo Infinite.




The new Halo was just the tip of the spear. The day also brought announcements on some 50 games and 20 exclusives designed to show the world the Xbox is the gaming device to buy, even if it’s not the most popular.

To emphasize that, the company wowed attendees at the Microsoft Theater in downtown Los Angeles with a series of announcements about plans for its most popular franchises, including the Gears of War space shooting epic and its hit Cuphead and Ori adventures games.

And if that’s not enough, Microsoft also dropped hints about its next Xbox console, saying teams are “deep into architecting” the next device, though it didn’t give a timetable for a release.

The company also said it’s building a new streaming service designed to allow gamers to play on an Xbox, PC or phone.

The message throughout all of it: Microsoft wants fans to know it hears them.

The company has been criticized for its lack of compelling and exclusive new games, something Nintendo and Sony have been successful at over the past few years.

The top recently released games list on game-review aggregating sister site Metacritic, for example, include Sony’s God of War epic and Nintendo’s update for Donkey Kong.

While Microsoft does have some popular exclusive games of its own, such as Halo and Gears of War, the criticism has grown louder.

That includes exclusive games made by Microsoft. “We always tell our teams to focus on the gamer,” he added. “If fans ask us for exclusives and first-party titles, that’s where we’re going to focus.”

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Pass it on: Popular Science

Nintendo Introduced A New Product Called ‘Labo’

Nintendo surprised the world once again this week.

The Japanese gaming powerhouse announced a new product with a strange name: “Nintendo Labo.”

Stranger than the name, however, is the product itself: a cardboard construction kit for building gaming peripherals. A what?

It’s worth explaining up front what you actually do with Labo. It’s not just a toy you buy, but a construction set for toys that are used with the Nintendo Switch console. The sets start at $70, and come with games.




The project may seem strange, but it’s actually a perfect marriage of Nintendo’s history as a toy maker and its recent history as a video game powerhouse.

The word “Nintendo” is synonymous with “video games,” and has been for nearly 40 years.

But the company’s actually far older than you may know — over 128 years old! — and much of its history had nothing to do with Italian plumbers fighting evil turtles.

The bulk of Nintendo’s history was spent as a playing-card manufacturer, up until the mid ’60s when it began creating toys.

That toy division eventually morphed into one that focused on a burgeoning format — video games — in the late ’70s.

All of which is to say one thing: Nintendo Labo makes a lot of sense given Nintendo’s history.

It’s a toy. It’s a game. It’s something you build  — that you create — and then play with. It can be drawn on, or covered in stickers, or accidentally stepped on.

Maybe you’ll have to repair it with duct tape and, uh, an old soda carton. Maybe you use the box Labo came in!

Isn’t that kind of rad, actually?

On paper, Labo is a kind-of DIY, adaptable gaming peripheral, with custom games made specifically for the various permutations of that peripheral. In reality, it’s a custom game controller that kids get to build, fix, and own.

Here, Nintendo uses cardboard as a feature, not a flaw. Cardboard can be repaired easily! It also lends itself to modifications, which will assuredly result in some delightful, unexpected ways to play Labo games.

Nintendo is selling a box full of cardboard for $70 with some basic software!” one might argue.

What Nintendo is actually offering with Labo is a relatively inexpensive, Lego-like experience on its wildly popular Nintendo Switch console.

Better yet: The entry-level set, the “Variety Kit,” offers five different builds of varying complexities. Considering the cost of a Lego set nowadays, you’re probably not doing too bad by comparison!

Nintendo Labo is set to launch on April 20 2018.

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Pass it on: Popular Science