Tag: Photography

Everything You Need To Know About Canon’s EOS R Camera

Canon and Nikon protected their DSLR turf as long as possible, but Sony has been killing them lately with its mirrorless range.

Nikon finally jumped into the fray by launching the Z6 and Z7 models, and today, Canon unveiled the $2,299 EOS R, a 30.3-megapixel video-centric full-frame mirrorless camera.

It also introduced a new lens mount, Canon RF, along with four lenses, including three interesting high-end “L” models.

The EOS R slots between Sony’s A7 III and A7R III and the Nikon Z6 and Z7, resolution-wise. It’s a near match to Canon’s own EOS 5D Mark IV DSLR, with similar resolution, dual-pixel autofocus, shooting speeds and video specifications.

Canon unveiled the EOS R with four lenses, one more than the Z6 and Z7 had at launch. They are, I daresay, also more interesting than Nikon’s Z-Mount models.




The first is the Canon RF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM model, a very solid kit lens for both photographers and videographers.

There’s a macro lens available right off the bat too: the RF 35mm f/1.8 IS STM Macro. At 35mm, it will do double-duty as a relatively inexpensive walking-around lens.

The last two are the most interesting (and expensive). Canon’s RF 28-70mm f/2L USM is an extremely fast zoom lens with a normal range that illustrates the power of the new mount.

The company also launched a 50mm f/1.2 that’s not quite as light-sensitive as Nikon’s crazy f/0.95 Z-Noct, but it’s still damn fast and will be available sooner.

On top of the regular focus and zoom controls, each of the new lenses has a special new control ring. You can program it to change f-stop, shutter speed and other settings.

The three new EF to RS lens adapters, meanwhile, will let you use any EF and even EF-S lenses (with a crop on the latter) with no loss in quality.

You’ll also get full autofocus, stabilization and metering capabilities, so you won’t be left in the lurch if you already have a lot of Canon glass.

Canon also introduced a lens adapters for drop in neutral density and other filters, and another with a control ring much like the one on the new RF lenses.

All of those will let you use EF and EF-S lenses exactly as if they’re on a 5D Mark IV or other DSLR, Canon promised.

Unfortunately, because of the mount size (54mm with a 20mm flange distance), it will never be compatible with Canon’s mirrorless APS-C EOS-M system.

This will likely anger EOS-M owners, especially because Sony lets you use full-frame lenses on APS-C E-Mount cameras like the A6500, and E-Mount lenses on A7 cameras (albeit with cropping on the latter).

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This Camera Will Take a 1,000-Year Photo to Document Climate Change

It was important to make the camera durable, with minimal moving parts.

Climate change is arguably the most important challenge ever faced by our species, but the magnitude of the problem and timescales involved can make it difficult to conceptualize in human terms.

To this end, the self-described “experimental philosopher” and artist Jonathon Keats has designed a pinhole camera that will take a 1,000-year exposure of Lake Tahoe, which straddles the border of California and Nevada.

Keats, whose most recent project was a brain-controlled factory, hopes the cameras will help our descendants understand climate dynamics and help people envision their long-term impact on the environment today.

We are changing the planet on timescales of a 1,000, 10,000 or even 100,000 years and we’re completely incapable of psychologically appreciating the power that we have,” Keats told me on the phone.

They’re a means to have a sort of cognitive prosthesis, a mechanism for us to be able to see ourselves from that far-future perspective.”




Keats’ placed his Millennium Cameras at four locations around Lake Tahoe. Each camera is made of copper and is only 2.75 inches long and 2.25 inches in diameter. Inside the camera is a sheet of 24-karat gold pierced by a small hole.

As light passes through this small hole, it causes a reaction with the rose-colored pigment inside the camera, which causes the color to fade where the light is the brightest. This will slowly imprint an image on the pigment over the next 1,000 years.

According to Keats, the Millennium Cameras have been years in the making. They originated from a project Keats did in Berlin, in which dozens of cheap pinhole cameras were sold for a few dollars apiece and meant to document the way the city was changing.

These cameras would be placed in a location by their purchaser and left there for 100 years at which point they would be collected and the photos featured in a museum.

A pinhole camera placed in the landscape it will document for the next 1000 years.

Although pinhole cameras date back to the earliest days of photography, Keats had to specially adapt the design for his Millennium Cameras.

The 100 year cameras placed around Berlin created a picture on a paper-based emulsion and this was unlikely to withstand 1,000 years outside.

The problem is that photography has only been around since the mid-nineteenth century so there isn’t really any data available for how best to preserve images on this sort of timescale.

The millennium cameras are circular and made entirely of copper, except for the pinhole aperture which has been pierced through a piece of 24 carat gold.

According to Keats, the best data he could find on long-term image preservation was from studies done on renaissance paintings, many of which are well over 500 years old.

If a painting or photograph is left for too long in the light, it will begin to fade. The rate at which it fades depends on both the amount of light it is exposed to as well as the material the painting is made of.

A similar effect is at work in Keats’ Millenn20ial Cameras. The main difference is that the pinhole is projecting an image of whatever the camera is pointed at, so when the pigment inside the camera fades, it reproduces that image.

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This Isn’t The End Of Printed Photos, It’s The Golden Age

As a society, we now produce more photographs than ever before, and the total number is becoming difficult to fathom. This year, it is estimated that billions of humans armed with smartphones will take some 1.2 trillion pictures.

Many of them will be shared on social media, but many more will simply be forgotten. A few good selfies will flash before your eyes as you swipe left or right on them, late some Friday night.

But hardly any will make the transition into the physical world, bits becoming blots of ink that coalesce into an image on a piece of paper, canvas, wood, or metal — a print.

The reasons for this are rational, and there’s no point fighting progress, but nor should we ignore the value of a print. We may no longer print every photo by default, but this can actually be a good thing for printing.

It is now about quality rather than quantity, and the pictures we choose to print deserve the best treatment.

Honestly, there has never been a better time to print than now, thanks to technological advances in both digital cameras and inkjet printers.

If you haven’t yet tried your hand at photo printing, you owe it to yourself to do so, even if you’re just a casual photographer.




Print isn’t dead — it’s better than ever

It’s a common refrain in the digital age, and not just in reference to photography. Print is dead, or at least dying, right? In truth, a certain type of print has certainly declined, but this isn’t a tragedy.

Prints used to be the only way we had to view our photos. We’d drop our film off at the drugstore and pick it up 24 hours later not because it was a better system, but because it was all we had.

We tend to romanticize the print, but when printing was the norm, many photos were still lost and forgotten (and some were found again).

Most were destined for photo albums or shoeboxes that would sit around and collect dust until moving day. If fewer were forgotten, it was because fewer were made.

Far fewer, in fact — in 2000, Kodak announced 80 billion pictures had been taken that year.

Sure, that sounds like a lot (it was a new milestone at the time), but for those who think of such large numbers as vague clouds of zeros, consider that 80 billion is still 1.12 trillion shy of 2017’s 1.2 trillion photos.

For the mathematically disinclined, let’s put it another way: Subtracting the total number of photos made in the year 2000 from those made in 2017 would have no effect on the number of shirtless mirror selfies posted by lonely men on Tinder.

With so many photos being taken, it’s no wonder so relatively few are being printed. Every print costs money, after all, so of course people aren’t going to print 1.3 trillion photos.

What’s more, the point of printing (often the point of taking a photo in the first place) was to share your memory with someone else.

Now that we don’t need prints to do that, it makes sense that people are choosing not to spend money on them, especially when electronically sharing images also happens to be much more convenient.

But people still love prints. Even the “low end” of printing is alive and well as instant photography has seen a huge resurgence in recent years.

Polaroid Originals has built an entire brand around it, and Fujifilm Instax cameras and film packs made up six of the top ten best selling photography products on Amazon last holiday season.

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Adobe Has Confirmed That It Will Release A Full-Fat Version Of Photoshop For iPad Next Year

Photoshop is one of the most well known and widely used pieces of software on the planet. And in 2019 it will be coming to iPad.

This will be the first time Adobe has released anything outside the confines of traditional computing platforms. It is also a testament to just how significant Apple’s iOS platform has now become.

Photoshop for iPad will be announced at Adobe’s MAX creativity conference in October, before a release sometime in 2019.




It is NOT A Mobile Version of Software

Mobile versions of Photoshop, Illustrator, and Premiere have been available, in a limited capacity, inside the App Store for a while.

But this Photoshop release will NOT be like these apps; rather, it will be a fully-fledged, complete program that has all the same features as the desktop software.

Adobe embraced the cloud back in 2012 and now, six years later, it is once again looking towards new areas for expansion.

The iPad – most notably the iPad Pro – is a clear path into the hands of millions of new customers.

The iPad Pro is insanely powerful and perfectly suited to Photoshop, so it’s no wonder that Adobe is targeting it with Photoshop.

Why So Long?

Most likely because applications like Photoshop require A LOT of processing power, and iPads have only just started catching up with desktop computing in the last couple of years.

Photoshop For iPad Release Date?

The launch of the software is still 5-6 months away, according to reports.

This means an actual release for Photoshop for iPad could still be 12 months away.

Still, work is now underway, so that’s something.

There’s no word on pricing just yet either, but it’s likely to be in the same ballpark as Photoshop for PC and Mac (meaning it’ll be pricey).

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Kodak Brings Ektachrome Back to Life

Kodak announced Thursday it will bring back its Ektachrome film, better known as color reversal film.

In 2012, Kodak discontinued its line of color reversal films, which stand out for its fine grain, clean colors, sharp tones and contrasts. At the time, Kodak blamed declining demand for such film.

A year later, Kodak divested its film business to Kodak Alaris, the UK-based company behind Ektachrome’s revival.




Over the next 12 months, Kodak Alaris will be remanufacturing the film at Kodak’s factory in Rochester, N.Y., with the revived film available for both motion picture and photography.

Color reversal film is quite complicated as its recipe is concerned,” says Diane Carroll-Yacoby, Kodak’s world wide portfolio manager for motion picture films says.

A tall tale.

It’s very unique and quite different than a black-and-white film or a color negative film.

“We’re in the process right now of procuring the components that are needed for this special film and in addition to that we are setting up a color reversal processing capability again, which we have to have in order to test the film as we manufacture it.

Into the light.

She adds: “It is a complicated project for us to bring it back but because our customers are telling us that they want it, we’re very excited to do this again. It’s kind of a really special time for us.

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Watch The Rocket Launch This Camera Died To Capture

A different, less fiery angle of the rocket launch.

On May 22, NASA photographer Bill Ingalls set up his Canon camera to capture footage of the launch of a SpaceX Falcon 9.

He got the shot, sort of, but not before that very launch ignited a small brush fire that did the poor camera in for good.

Although this martyr of rocket photography has closed its shutter for the very last time, we’re all fortunate enough to be able to see the footage it died to bring us.




As Ingalls mentioned in a NASA feature on the melted camera, this particular setup was actually outside the safety perimeter for the Falcon launch. At a quarter mile away, it was actually the furthest of all six Ingalls had set up.

The flames creeping closer to the camera.

That distance did nothing to save it when a brush fire started in the vicinity, melting the camera’s body but leaving its memory card intact so we could see its last gaze.

The camera is set to be put on display in NASA’s Washington DC headquarters. A fitting resting place for a true hero.

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How To Sell Photos Online: For Both Amateur And Pro Photographers

Making money as a photographer, like a YouTuber or Instagrammer, is all about harnessing that same creativity at the heart of your work and applying it to the monetization of your talents.

It can seem hard to make it when anyone with the newest iPhone can call themselves a “photographer.” But success, for most creators who turn to entrepreneurship, comes down to three things:

  1. Finding your niche.
  2. Building an audience.
  3. Creating several streams of income.

This guide will explore some of the things you should know about selling photos online with resources to help you make your photography-based business a reality.




How to sell photos online: two essential steps

Defining your niche

Every successful photographer has a consistent style or theme that runs through their work. Whether your thing is travel, fashion, cityscapes, nature, food, etc., consistency is key.

People follow other people online to see more of whatever it is that interested them in the first place. People unfollow other people when those expectations aren’t met.

Finding your niche if you want to sell pictures online is typically something you feel your way into as you see which styles and photos resonate with your audience.

Integrate ecommerce into your portfolio

Most photographers have a main portfolio site to showcase their work and let clients hire them.

But by adding ecommerce to it, including the ability to accept payments, you can open several more doors to monetization, like selling courses, physical products, and services.

20 best place to sell photos online

  1. Getty Images
  2. Shutterstock
  3. iStock
  4. 500px
  5. Stocksy
  6. Can Stock Photo
  7. FreeDigitalPhotos.net
  8. Adobe Stock
  9. Fotolia
  10. PhotoDune
  11. Alamy
  12. Twenty20
  13. Depositphotos
  14. Dreamstime
  15. GL Stock Images
  16. EyeEm
  17. Image Vortex
  18. Crestock
  19. 123RF
  20. Foap

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Huawei Says Three Cameras Are Better Than One With P20 Pro Smartphone

Huawei’s latest flagship smartphone is the P20 Pro, which has not one, not two, but three cameras on the back.

The new P20, and the larger, more feature-packed P20 Pro, launched at an event in Paris that indicated the Chinese company is looking to match rivals Apple and Samsung and elevate the third-largest smartphone manufacture’s premium efforts.

The P20 has a 5.8in FHD+ LCD while the larger P20 Pro has a 6.1in FHD+ OLED screen, both with a notch at the top similar to Apple’s iPhone X containing a 24-megapixel selfie camera.

They both have a fingerprint scanner on the front but no headphone socket in the bottom.

The P20 and P20 Plus are also available in pink gold or a blue twilight gradient colour finish that resembles pearlescent paint found on some cars – a first, Huawei says, for a glass-backed smartphone.




The P20 has an improved version of Huawei’s Leica dual camera system, which pairs a traditional 12-megapixel colour camera to a 20-megapixel monochrome one, as used on the recent Mate 10 Pro.

But the P20 Pro also has a third 8-megapixel telephoto camera below the first two, producing up to a 5x hybrid zoom – which Huawei says, enables the phone to “see brighter, further, faster and with richer colour”.

When I first heard that Huawei’s new flagship device was going to have three rear-facing cameras I was sceptical,” said Ben Wood, chief of research at CCS Insight.

But it feels like the company has added meaningful features rather than gimmicks, including the five-times telephoto zoom, excellent low light, long exposure performance and crisp black and white pictures the dedicated monochrome lens offers.

Huawei has also improved its built-in AI system for the camera, which recognises objects and scenes, pre-selecting the best of 19 modes for the subject.

Huawei’s AI will also help people straighten photos and zoom in or out to assist with composing group shots.

The company is also pushing its new AI-powered stablisation for both photos and videos, which Huawei says solves the problem of wobbly hands in long-exposure night shots.

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Google Clips: A Smart Camera That Doesn’t Make The Grade

Picture this: you’re hanging out with your kids or pets and they spontaneously do something interesting or cute that you want to capture and preserve.

But by the time you’ve gotten your phone out and its camera opened, the moment has passed and you’ve missed your opportunity to capture it.

That’s the main problem that Google is trying to solve with its new Clips camera, a $249 device available starting today that uses artificial intelligence to automatically capture important moments in your life.

Google says it’s for all of the in-between moments you might miss when your phone or camera isn’t in your hand.




It is meant to capture your toddler’s silly dance or your cat getting lost in an Amazon box without requiring you to take the picture.

The other issue Google is trying to solve with Clips is letting you spend more time interacting with your kids directly, without having a phone or camera separating you, while still getting some photos.

That’s an appealing pitch to both parents and pet owners alike, and if the Clips camera system is able to accomplish its goal, it could be a must-have gadget for them.

But if it fails, then it’s just another gadget that promises to make life easier, but requires more work and maintenance than it’s worth.

The problem for Google Clips is it just doesn’t work that well.

Before we get into how well Clips actually works, I need to discuss what it is and what exactly it’s doing because it really is unlike any camera you’ve used before.

At its core, the Clips camera is a hands-free automatic point-and-shoot camera that’s sort of like a GoPro, but considerably smaller and flatter.

It has a cute, unassuming appearance that is instantly recognizable as a camera, or at least an icon of a camera app on your phone.

Google, aware of how a “camera that automatically takes pictures when it sees you” is likely to be perceived, is clearly trying to make the Clips appear friendly, with its white-and-teal color scheme and obvious camera-like styling.

But of those that I showed the camera to while explaining what it’s supposed to do, “it’s creepy” has been a common reaction.

One thing that I’ve discovered is that people know right away it’s a camera and react to it just like other any camera.

That might mean avoiding its view when they see it, or, like in the case of my three-year-old, walking up to it and smiling or picking it up.

That has made it tough to capture candids, since, for the Clips to really work, it needs to be close to its subject.

Maybe over time, your family would learn to ignore it and those candid shots could happen, but in my couple weeks of testing, my family hasn’t acclimated to its presence.

The Clips’ camera sensor can capture 12-megapixel images at 15 frames per second, which it then saves to its 16GB of internal storage that’s good for about 1,400 seven-second clips.

The battery lasts roughly three hours between charges.

Included with the camera is a silicone case that makes it easy to prop up almost anywhere or, yes, clip it to things. It’s not designed to be a body camera or to be worn.

Instead, it’s meant to be placed in positions where it can capture you in the frame as well.

There are other accessories you can buy, like a case that lets you mount the Clips camera to a tripod for more positioning options, but otherwise, using the Clips camera is as simple as turning it on and putting it where you want it.

Once the camera has captured a bunch of clips, you use the app to browse through them on your phone, edit them down to shorter versions, grab still images, or just save the whole thing to your phone’s storage for sharing and editing later.

The Clips app is supposed to learn based on which clips you save and deem “important” and then prioritize capturing similar clips in the future.

You can also hit a toggle to view “suggested” clips for saving, which is basically what the app thinks you’ll like out of the clips it has captured.

Google’s definitely onto something here. The idea is an admirable first step toward a new kind of camera that doesn’t get between me and my kids. But first steps are tricky — ask any toddler!

Usually, after you take your first step, you fall down. To stand back up, Google Clips needs to justify its price, the hassle of setting it up, and the fiddling between it and my phone.

It needs to reassure me that by trusting it and putting my phone away, I won’t miss anything important, and I won’t be burdened by having to deal with a lot of banal captures.

Otherwise, it’s just another redundant gadget that I have to invest too much time and effort into managing to get too little in return.

That’s a lot to ask of a tiny little camera, and this first version doesn’t quite get there. To live up to it all, Clips needs to be both a better camera and a smarter one.

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Sky Watching Tips And Tricks For Cold Northern Nights

For much of the contiguous United States this winter has been marked by perpetual ice, snow as well as the now infamous polar vortex.

Such conditions might make even the most committed stargazer think twice before venturing outdoors.

Stepping outside to enjoy a view of the constellation Orion, Jupiter or even just the waxing moon these frosty nights takes only a minute or two, but if you plan to stay outside longer, remember that enjoying the starry winter sky requires protection against the cold temperatures.




The best garments are a hooded ski parka and ski pants, both of which are lightweight and provide excellent insulation. And remember your feet.

Two pairs of warm socks in loose-fitting shoes are quite adequate; for protracted observing on bitter-cold nights wear insulated boots.

Reach for the binoculars

In weather like this, one quickly will realize the advantage of using a pair of good binoculars over a telescope.

A person who attempts to set even a so-called “portable” scope up in bitter temperatures or blustery winds might give up even before he or she got started.

But binoculars can be hand-held and will produce some quickly magnified images of celestial objects before rushing back inside to escape the frigidity.

Transparency

In their handy observing guide, “The Stars” (Golden Press, N.Y.), authors Herbert Zim and Robert Baker write that “the sky is never clearer than on cold, sparkling winter nights.

“It is at these times that the fainter stars are seen in great profusion. Then the careful observer can pick out dim borderline stars and nebulae that cannot be seen when the sky is less clear.

What Zim and Baker were referring to is sky transparency, which is always at its best during the winter season. That’s because Earth’s atmosphere is not as hazy because it is less moisture laden.

Cold air has less capacity to hold moisture, therefore the air is drier and thus much clearer as opposed to the summer months when the sky appears hazier.

But this clarity can also come at a price.

Seeing through the twinkles

If you step outside on one of those “cold, sparkling nights” you might notice the stars twinkling vibrantly.

This is referred to as scintillation, and to the casual observer looking skyward, they might think of such a backdrop as the perfect night for an astronomer, but it isn’t.

This is because when looking skyward, skywatchers are trying to see the sky through various layers of a turbulent atmosphere.

Were we to train a telescope on a star, or a bright planet like Mars, what we would end up with is a distorted image that either seems to shake or quiver or simply “boils” to the extent that you really can’t see very much in terms of any detail.

Forecasting sky conditions

If you own a telescope, you don’t need to wait for balmy summer nights to get good views. Usually, a few days after a big storm or frontal passage, the center of a dome of high pressure will build in to bring clear skies and less wind.

And while the sky might not seem quite as “crisp” or “pristine” as it was a few days earlier, the calming effect of less winds will afford you a view of less turbulent and clearer images through your telescope.

More comfortable nights ahead

If you plan on heading out on a cold winter’s night — and if you’re doing it while under a dome of high pressure — the fact that there is less wind means not only potentially good seeing, but also more comfort viewing conditions.

The end of winter is in sight though. The Northern Hemisphere is officially halfway through the winter season and milder, more comfortable nights are within reach.

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