Tag: robot dog

This Robot Dog Can Recover From a Vicious Kick Using Artificial Intelligence

Researchers at ETH Zurich in Switzerland taught a four-legged robot dog a valuable life skill: how to get up again after it gets knocked down. And yes, it involved evil scientists kicking and shoving an innocent robot.

The researchers used an AI model to teach ANYmal, a doglike robot made by ANYbotics, how to right itself after being knocked onto its side or back in a variety of physical environments — as opposed to giving the robot a detailed set of instructions for only one specific environment.




But It Gets Up Again

The results were published in a paper today on Science Robotics. In simple terms, the robot tried again and again to right itself in simulation, and learned from instances when a movement didn’t end up righting it.

It then took what it learned and applied it to the real world.

It even learned how to run faster than it could before. Thanks to the neural network, ANYmal was also able to reach 1.5 metres per second or just over three mph in mere hours, according to a report.

Never Gonna Keep It Down

Are we inching closer to a future where robot guard dogs chase us down to exact revenge on us, as seen on Netflix’s Black Mirror? Sure looks like it.

So perhaps it’s time to stop kicking robot dogs — before we know it, they’ll start learning how to protect themselves.

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Pass it on: New Scientist

Meet MiRO: The robot dog with a mind of its own

Attendees of the International Conference on Robotics and Automation last year met MiRO. The robotic pet dog that has been built to provide the elderly with company.

MiRO – designed by Consequential Robotics looks and behaves like a pet dog, and has six ‘senses’ including touch sensitivity, light sensitivity, stereo eyesight and sharp hearing.

The robot dog uses a sonar sense, like bats and dolphins, to help navigate its surroundings, and MiRO’s cliff sensors help to ensure that it does not fall off a table or down a flight of stairs.

“At the heart of our approach is human-centred design – understanding the practical  needs  of  our  users  as  well as  their  emotional  wants  and  dreams,” said designer, Sebastian Conran.

Although the long-term plan is for MiRO to be a companion robot, initially the robot will be marketed to researchers who are interested in  developing  companion  robots  and  to  universities  doing  research  in robotics  or  offering training  in  robot  programming.

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Pass it on: New Scientist