Tag: tumors

Boosting The Immune System With Vaccines To Fight Cancer

cancer cells

Immunotherapies have been taking the biotech world by storm. Among these are cancer vaccines, which are directed at solid tumors and aim to boost patients’ immune systems to fight cancer.

The cancer vaccine world is broad, with many players.Here’s an overview of some of the current efforts underway by European biotechs.

One big player in the cancer vaccine world is BioNTech, a German biotech working on personalized mRNA-based immunotherapies.

We try to provide individualized immunotherapies. If you try to compare two patients’ tumors, they are never the same. We recognize this fact and try to develop individualized treatments for each patient,” Sean Marett, the company’s COO, said last June 20 at Labiotech Refresh in Berlin.




One of BioNTech’s cancer vaccine platforms is IVAC (Individualized Vaccines Against Cancer) MUTANOME, where patient’s tumors are sequenced to identify neoantigens, which are then incorporated into an mRNA-based vaccine.

We’re doing, effectively, de novo target discovery in real time,” Marett says.

The company also has two approaches, FixVAC and RNA WAREHOUSE, which are based on the knowledge that across patient populations, there are shared antigens that are expressed differently in each individual.

“Regarding our FixVac approach, each eligible patient is treated with exactly the same product,” Marett tells Labiotech.

“With respect to our RNA WAREHOUSE concept, we’re calibrating the treatment for each patient to their individualized expression of the cancer-selective shared antigens.”

cancer cells

BioNTech has partnered with big industry players, such as Genentech, to develop its cancer vaccines.

They currently have a number of products in Phase I and Phase I/II clinical trials for various indications, including melanoma, head and neck cancer, and breast cancer.

Another German biotech, CureVac, is also working hard to bring mRNA-based approach to the clinic. Though they recently suffered a Phase II failure of its candidate CV9104 for prostate cancer. The company has additional drugs in the pipeline, including a vaccine targeting non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

syringe

The company has additional drugs in the pipeline, including a vaccine targeting non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

“What we’ve learned here is that mRNA is not enough on its own— you have to break tolerance and you have to make it more immunogenic.” CureVac CEO Ingmar Hoerr told Labiotech in January.

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Can People Catch Cancer? Not Likely, But Some Animals Can

These guys are seriously threatened by a contagious cancer, largely because of how much they love to touch each other’s faces.

Recent headlines about contagious cancers found in some animals may make you wonder: Could I catch cancer? In Australia, Tasmanian devils are dying from aggressive facial tumors caused by a contagious virus.

In the Atlantic Ocean, some clams are developing a form of leukemia caused by cancer cells suspended in the water. And scientists have known for years that dogs can spread cancer cells from one to another during intercourse.

Despite recent headlines about cancer being contagious in other species, current data shows it’s virtually impossible in humans,” says Dr. Glen Weiss, Director of Clinical Research and Phase I & II Clinical Trials at our hospital near Phoenix.

“There have been attempts to transfect people without cancer with cancer cells, and it did not work.”

In the 1950s and 1960s, Dr. Chester Southam, a New York immunologist, conducted several controversial experiments by injecting live cancer cells into uninformed cancer patients and healthy prisoners.




While patients in both studies grew tumors, those in the healthy patients were quickly attacked and eliminated by their immune systems.

Foreign cells would more likely be rejected just like an organ donation or bone marrow transplant from a donor,” Dr. Weiss says.

In order to take, a recipient would likely require significant immunosuppression.” Southam was widely criticized for his experiments on humans and his medical license was suspended for one year.

Organ recipients are at a higher risk of developing cancer, but only in rare cases has the cancer been linked to the organ donor having cancer.

Such cases are so rare that some cancer patients are still eligible to donate organs. Some recipients develop cancer because the body’s immune system is suppressed to help prevent organ rejection.

Fortunately, survival of transplanted cancers in healthy humans is exceedingly rare and documented by only a small handful of cases,” Dr. James S. Welsh, a radiation oncologist currently with the Loyola University Health System writes in a 2011 article on contagious cancer.

“Thus, friends and family members of cancer patients and we, as caregivers of cancer patients, need not be unduly concerned with the remote possibility of ‘catching cancer.”

Humans may spread contagious viruses that lead to cancer. For instance, the human papillomavirus (HPV)  is responsible for virtually all cases of cervical cancer.

It is also linked to most cases of vaginal and vulvar cancer and more than half the cases of penile cancer. The virus is also linked to 90 percent of anal cancers and 72 percent of oropharyngeal cancer.

The hepatitis B and C viruses may lead to hepatocellular carcinoma, the most common type of liver cancer.

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