Tag: Video

Google Clips: A Smart Camera That Doesn’t Make The Grade

Picture this: you’re hanging out with your kids or pets and they spontaneously do something interesting or cute that you want to capture and preserve.

But by the time you’ve gotten your phone out and its camera opened, the moment has passed and you’ve missed your opportunity to capture it.

That’s the main problem that Google is trying to solve with its new Clips camera, a $249 device available starting today that uses artificial intelligence to automatically capture important moments in your life.

Google says it’s for all of the in-between moments you might miss when your phone or camera isn’t in your hand.




It is meant to capture your toddler’s silly dance or your cat getting lost in an Amazon box without requiring you to take the picture.

The other issue Google is trying to solve with Clips is letting you spend more time interacting with your kids directly, without having a phone or camera separating you, while still getting some photos.

That’s an appealing pitch to both parents and pet owners alike, and if the Clips camera system is able to accomplish its goal, it could be a must-have gadget for them.

But if it fails, then it’s just another gadget that promises to make life easier, but requires more work and maintenance than it’s worth.

The problem for Google Clips is it just doesn’t work that well.

Before we get into how well Clips actually works, I need to discuss what it is and what exactly it’s doing because it really is unlike any camera you’ve used before.

At its core, the Clips camera is a hands-free automatic point-and-shoot camera that’s sort of like a GoPro, but considerably smaller and flatter.

It has a cute, unassuming appearance that is instantly recognizable as a camera, or at least an icon of a camera app on your phone.

Google, aware of how a “camera that automatically takes pictures when it sees you” is likely to be perceived, is clearly trying to make the Clips appear friendly, with its white-and-teal color scheme and obvious camera-like styling.

But of those that I showed the camera to while explaining what it’s supposed to do, “it’s creepy” has been a common reaction.

One thing that I’ve discovered is that people know right away it’s a camera and react to it just like other any camera.

That might mean avoiding its view when they see it, or, like in the case of my three-year-old, walking up to it and smiling or picking it up.

That has made it tough to capture candids, since, for the Clips to really work, it needs to be close to its subject.

Maybe over time, your family would learn to ignore it and those candid shots could happen, but in my couple weeks of testing, my family hasn’t acclimated to its presence.

The Clips’ camera sensor can capture 12-megapixel images at 15 frames per second, which it then saves to its 16GB of internal storage that’s good for about 1,400 seven-second clips.

The battery lasts roughly three hours between charges.

Included with the camera is a silicone case that makes it easy to prop up almost anywhere or, yes, clip it to things. It’s not designed to be a body camera or to be worn.

Instead, it’s meant to be placed in positions where it can capture you in the frame as well.

There are other accessories you can buy, like a case that lets you mount the Clips camera to a tripod for more positioning options, but otherwise, using the Clips camera is as simple as turning it on and putting it where you want it.

Once the camera has captured a bunch of clips, you use the app to browse through them on your phone, edit them down to shorter versions, grab still images, or just save the whole thing to your phone’s storage for sharing and editing later.

The Clips app is supposed to learn based on which clips you save and deem “important” and then prioritize capturing similar clips in the future.

You can also hit a toggle to view “suggested” clips for saving, which is basically what the app thinks you’ll like out of the clips it has captured.

Google’s definitely onto something here. The idea is an admirable first step toward a new kind of camera that doesn’t get between me and my kids. But first steps are tricky — ask any toddler!

Usually, after you take your first step, you fall down. To stand back up, Google Clips needs to justify its price, the hassle of setting it up, and the fiddling between it and my phone.

It needs to reassure me that by trusting it and putting my phone away, I won’t miss anything important, and I won’t be burdened by having to deal with a lot of banal captures.

Otherwise, it’s just another redundant gadget that I have to invest too much time and effort into managing to get too little in return.

That’s a lot to ask of a tiny little camera, and this first version doesn’t quite get there. To live up to it all, Clips needs to be both a better camera and a smarter one.

Please like, share and tweet this article.

Pass it on: Popular Science

Video Captures Moment When Kid Is Nearly Hit By Lightning

An Argentine mom filming her 12-year-old son fooling around with an umbrella ended up capturing his brush with death as a lightning bolt struck just feet away.

The video shows the unidentified pre-teen standing under a roof drainpipe, with water pouring out onto the umbrella.

Seconds later, he walks out into a garden in the city of Posadas, in the northeastern Argentine province of Misiones.

Then out of nowhere, a powerful bolt of lightning strikes down just steps in front of the boy — causing a nearby fence to erupt in flames.




The boy’s frightened mom, Carolina Kotur, shrieked and quickly dropped her phone.

It was morning, I was with my daughter in the room calming her, because she is scared of lightning,” Kotur told local media.

Then the lady who works in my house told me that my son was walking in the rain and I started filming because I was making a joke, and right next to him the lightning struck. Thank God nothing happened to him.”

Others in the region were not so fortunate during the fierce storm, Central European News reported.

 

Brothers Sinforiano Venialgo Vazquez, 43, and Simon Venialgo Vazquez, 41, were killed when lightning struck near their home in the Paraguayan town of San Pedro del Parana — 68 miles from where the young boy was nearly hit by the bolt.

The cause of death in both cases was electrocution, though no further details were available, according to the report.

Lightning strikes reportedly killed animals in the Santa Rosa area, on the Argentine side of the Parana River, the outlet reported.

Please like, share and tweet this article.

Pass it on: Popular Science