What Really Matters About Neuralink

Elon Musk made headlines last week when he announced the first product from his startup company, Neuralink. It’s a brain implant that will potentially allow quadriplegics to control phones, computers, and robotic arms. But that’s just the tip of the iceberg.

A Technology That Would Change The World (If It Exists)

Cold Fusion burst on the scene in 1989 with the announcement that researchers Fleischmann and Pons had created energy through a chemical process that induces fusion at room temperature.

When nobody else was able to replicate their findings, cold fusion went down as one of the biggest science fiascoes in decades. But some believe they were on the right track, and that their method could be the key to change the world.

Could Space-Based Solar Save The World?

Solar power is on the rise, and that’s a good thing. But solar power has one major drawback – it can’t make energy at night, which is literally half the time.

But there is a place where you have constant sun, 24 hours a day, with no cloud cover, and get twice as much energy – outer space.

Could giant solar panels in space be the key to unlimited energy?

The Weird Plan To Fight Climate Change With Mammoths

The current rate of species extinction is alarming, but it’s happening at a time when we may, for the first time in history, be able to bring back extinct species. We’re getting very close. And some think it may be a key to fighting climate change.

Movies like Jurassic Park have shown the wonders and dangers of bringing back extinct species. It’s not really science fiction anymore.

While we’re probably not going to be bringing back dinosaurs anytime soon – the DNA is just too damaged over that time – there is the potential for bringing back prehistoric mammals, and even animals that we’re losing in the current extinction event.

Some think that bringing back mammoths – or something like them – could help climate change by feeding on the bushes that absorb heat and thaw the permafrost.

Other species, like passenger pigeons, which once migrated in flocks so big they would darken the sky for days at a time, may have served to help keep forests healthy, and bringing them back could help with our forests.

And others, like the saber-tooth tiger, could be just for fun.

Could A Solar Superflare Destroy The World?

The sun is a solar flare machine, constantly spitting out waves of charged particles in all directions. Sometimes these hit Earth. Luckily we’re protected by a strong magnetic field that directs the particles to the poles, which we experience as the Northern Lights, or Aurora Borealis.

But from time to time, the sun erupts in a massive superflare, also known as a CME or Coronal Mass Ejection. These can push our magnetic shield to its limits and actually cause electrical problems on the ground.

One of the worst instances of a CME striking the Earth occurred in 1859. It disrupted the telegraph system and sent sparks flying out of switchboards. It became known as the Carrington Event and begs the question – what if it happened today?

Alan Shepard: American Badass

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Alan Shepard entered the history books by being the first American in space. And while his launch was overshadowed by that of Yuri Gagarin – which beat his by only a few weeks – his career, talent, and legacy are nothing short of legendary.

Alan Shepard was one of the Mercury 7 astronauts along with Deke Slayton, Gus Grissom, Scott Carpenter, John Glenn, Wally Shira, and Gordon Cooper. This was NASA’s first manned space program.

Alan’s mission was given the name Freedom 7 and he went up on a Mercury Redstone rocket. His flight was suborbital and only lasted 15 minutes, but started the US on the course for the moon.

But Alan Shepard’s early career started as a pilot in the Navy, where he ascended to become a test pilot, testing out the newest fighter jets and helping to decide which ones became part of the Navy’s arsenal.

After his Mercury flight, Shepard was grounded on account of Meniere’s Disease, which causes pressure in the inner ear and creates balance and orientation issues. But after corrective surgery, he was reinstated into the space program and served a commander on the Apollo 14 mission.