My Tesla Model 3 Test Drive w/Ben Sullins of Teslanomics

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Earlier this month, I travelled to Palm Springs for a YouTube event and hooked up with Ben Sullins from Teslanomics, who brought his Model 3 (which he named Tes), and I finally got a chance to drive it.

Talking Model 3 With Ben Sullins of Teslanomics

I recently traveled to Palm Springs and got a chance to hang out with Ben Sullins, who brought his Model 3 with him – and I got a chance to drive it!

Ben’s channel, Teslanomics, talks about Tesla from a data science standpoint. It’s a great source of Tesla news that cuts through all the hype. Find his channel here:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbEbf0-PoSuHD0TgMbxomDg

And see the video on my YouTube channel:

Rocket Lab’s Electron Is Making Space Open For Business (Feat. CEO Peter Beck)

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My interview with Peter Beck: https://answerswithjoe.com/peterbecka…

Rocket Lab is a private space company out of New Zealand founded by rocket engineer Peter Beck. Their goal is to open up space and satellite technology for business by building cheap, disposable rockets that are powerful and flexible.

Their Electron rocket is tiny – less than 1/3 the size of the Falcon 9 – but can launch 62% of payloads into space for only $5 million.

To do this, they have pioneered new technologies like the 3D printed Rutherford engine (named after Ernest Rutherford) that is powered by a battery pack, and completely carbon-fiber construction.

 

The Electron rocket is perfect for micro satellites and cube satellites, with a payload capacity of up to 225 kilograms.

Their first launch of the Electron was called It’s a Test, which achieved orbit, but had communication issues and had to be destroyed.

Their second launch was called Still Testing, which was a complete success, launching two commercial payloads and the Humanity Star satellite.

They also have built their own launch facility on the Mahia peninsula in New Zealand, which is the first privately owned launch facility in the world and the first in the southern hemisphere.

Their first commercial flight, called It’s Business Time is scheduled to launch in late Spring/early Summer 2018.

Rocket Lab’s Electron Is Making Space Open For Business (Feat. CEO Peter Beck)

You can get a free quote at lumerit.com/answerswithjoe. It’s the easy way to find out how much college will cost you, and what earning your degree will look like.

Rocket Lab is a private space company out of New Zealand founded by rocket engineer Peter Beck. Their goal is to open up space and satellite technology for business by building cheap, disposable rockets that are powerful and flexible.

Their Electron rocket is tiny – less than 1/3 the size of the Falcon 9 – but can launch 62% of payloads into space for only $5 million.

To do this, they have pioneered new technologies like the 3D printed Rutherford engine (named after Ernest Rutherford) that is powered by a battery pack, and completely carbon-fiber construction.

 

The Electron rocket is perfect for micro satellites and cube satellites, with a payload capacity of up to 225 kilograms.

Their first launch of the Electron was called It’s a Test, which achieved orbit, but had communication issues and had to be destroyed.

Their second launch was called Still Testing, which was a complete success, launching two commercial payloads and the Humanity Star satellite.

They also have built their own launch facility on the Mahia peninsula in New Zealand, which is the first privately owned launch facility in the world and the first in the southern hemisphere.

Their first commercial flight, called It’s Business Time is scheduled to launch in late Spring/early Summer 2018.

Rocket Lab CEO Peter Beck on His Mission To Transform Space As We Know It

On the YouTube channel today, I am releasing an often-requested video on Rocket Lab, the New Zealand private launch company that’s focusing on small, disposable rockets to serve the growing cubsat and micro satellite industry. And for the video, CEO Peter Beck was kind enough to spend some time talking with me about his company, his philosophy, and some of the engineering challenges to reaching space.

Find the YouTube video here:

https://youtu.be/zjg5CGylUkM

If you want to learn more about Rocket Lab, visit their website:

http://www.rocketlabusa.com

 

Most Of The Universe Is Missing And Other Space Mysteries

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Astronomers have solved some of the biggest questions of the universe, but many of their answers have only brought up more questions. Here are some of the biggest mysteries of space.

Ditching Microbeads: The Search For Sustainable Skincare

Is smoother skin worth more than having potable water or edible fish?

For years, research has shown that beauty products made with tiny microbeads, gritty cleansers that scrub off dead skin cells, have been damaging water supplies, marine life and the ecological balance of the planet.

Beat the Microbead, an international campaign to ban the plastic beads, reports that marine species are unable to distinguish between food and microbeads.

According to the campaign, “over 663 different species were negatively impacted by marine debris with approximately 11% of reported cases specifically related to the ingestion of microplastics“.

To make things worse, microbeads can act like tiny sponges, absorbing several other dangerous chemicals, including pesticides and flame retardants. As they ingest microbeads, marine animals also consume these other poisons.




The obvious solution to the microbead problem is to cut it off at the source.

But while major cosmetic companies like Johnson & Johnson, Unilever, and Procter & Gamble have pledged to phase out the use of microbeads in favor of natural alternatives, they also say that the shift could take several years.

And as more research is done, it appears that microbead replacements may come with dangers of their own.

Some of the natural replacements for microbeads also have negative consequences.

Greg Boyer, chair of the chemistry department at SUNY-College of Environmental Science and Forestry, says a possible negative consequence is with degrading sugars that biochemically “burn” the sugar for energy.

A variety of biodegradable ingredients are available to developers.

Victoria Fantauzzi, co-founder of Chicago-based La Bella Figura Beauty, says that her company recently released a facial cleanser that uses enzymes found in papaya and pineapple, ingredients known to effectively exfoliate skin cells.

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