10 People Who Died From Incredibly Minor Injuries | Random Thursday

From slipping on an orange peel to using too much deodorant, these are cases of people who died from incredibly minor injuries.

10 Death from Hamster Spit

Goro Ito, from Japan, Died after his pet hamster named Aiko bit him. The autopsy showed that he had died after reacting to a protein in the hamster’s saliva that brought about a case of anaphylaxis

9 Death from Peacock Scratch

On March 30, 1997, Vichai Thongto from Thailand was feeding the family’s four peacocks when one clawed at his head. He soon began suffering headaches and fell into a coma. A hospital scan showed a blood clot on his brain due to the peacock’s scratch. He died the next day.

8 Death from Deodorant

Jonathan Capewell from Oldham England was obsessed with smelling fresh and would cover his entire body with deodorant at least twice a day. He died July 20th, 1998 from a heart attack after the deodorant gasses built up in his body over months of repeatedly spraying himself in his unventilated bathroom.

7 Death from Manners

Tycho Brahe, a Danish nobleman and astronomer, died October 24, 1601 from bladder complications after attending a banquet where he refused to use the restroom knowing that it was impolite to leave before the meal was done. After the banquet Tycho no longer was able to urinate, and 10 days later he died. It is reported that he wrote his own epitaph, stating “He lived like a sage and died like a fool.”

6 Death by Dessert

Adolf Frederick, the King of Sweden, ate himself to death in 1771 after having a meal consisting of lobster, caviar, sauerkraut, cabbage soup, smoked herring, champagne, and 14 servings of his favorite dessert, Selma (Bread dipped in a bowl of hot milk) He is known by Swedish children as “The King that Ate Himself to Death”
I wonder if Tycho Brahe was at that meal because that would have taken a while…

5 Death by Laughter

On 24th of March 1975, Alex Mitchell passed away after watching the “Kung Fu Kapers” episode of The Goodies. Reportedly, due to the TV episode, Mitchell laughed continuously for 25 minutes, and finally fell dead on the sofa from heart failure. His widow later sent a thank you letter to The Goodies for making Mitchell’s final moments of life so pleasant.

4 Death by Fastball

At the top of the 5th inning, Ray “Chappie” Chapman, shortstop for the Cleveland Indians baseball team, was hit by a submarine ball thrown by Carl Mays. The Baseball hit Chapman in the temple. Chapman collapsed and died August 17, 1920, about 12 hours later. He remains the only baseball player killed by a pitched ball.

3 Death from Frustration

Jack Daniel, yes, THE Jack Daniel, died of blood poisoning the originated in his toe. One early morning in 1911, Jack daniel kicked his office safe in anger, because he couldn’t remember the combination to open it. That anger and a powerful kick to the safe resulted in an infection in his toe and ultimately his death. His last words were, “One last drink, please.”

2 Death by Tongue

Allan Pinkerton, the founder of the famous Pinkerton detective agency, died in Chicago in 1884 after he slipped on the pavement and severely bit down on his tongue. Due to the bit, his tongue became infected with gangrene, which resulted in his untimely death.

1 Death by Irony

Bobby Leach was one of the greatest dare devils to ever live. He would regularly perform death defying stunts and was only the second person in history to go over the side of the Niagara Falls in a barrel. One day, however, while walking down a quiet street in New Zealand, Leach slipped on an orange peel, broke his leg, and died due to complications that he developed afterwards.

Augmented Reality Vs. Virtual Reality

Augmented reality and virtual reality devices are on the cusp of explosive growth. So what’s the difference between the two, and which will make a bigger impact on our lives?

 

Virtual Reality at E3 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jyfiG…

History of Virtual Reality https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=43mA_…

Microsoft Hololens Review https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ihKUo…

Magic Leap Demo https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GmdXJ…

Paraplegics using VR to walk again https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pb36O…

Why We Should Try To Contact Aliens – My Interview With Doug Vakoch

In today’s podcast, I sit down with Doug Vakoch, the founder of METI, or Messaging Extra Terrestrial Intelligence. We talk about why METI was founded, what their goals are, why we should try to contact aliens, and respond to some of the criticisms of the organization.

If you’re interested in learning more about what they do or want to get involved, you can check them out at www.meti.org.

Are Quantum Computers On The Verge Of A Breakthrough?

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For years now, quantum computers have been just out of reach, but some exciting new developments over the last year indicate that the age of quantum computing is a lot closer than we think.

 

Check out Jason’s channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCS-u…

LINKS LINKS LINKS:

D-Wave video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zvfkX…

Quantum Annealing Explained: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UV_Rl…

Supercooled qubits: https://newatlas.com/stable-supercool…

IBM’s new Neuromorphic chip: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nE819…

Google Bristlecone: https://www.sciencenews.org/article/g…

Silicon based quantum chip: https://gizmodo.com/new-silicon-chip-…

The Evolution of the SpaceX Falcon 9

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SpaceX is on a roll lately with the launch of their Falcon Heavy rocket, but the real workhorse of the SpaceX lineup is the Falcon 9. So let’s look at the development of the Falcon 9 and how it got this way.

SpaceX is the most successful private rocket launch company in the world, and it’s due in large part to the Falcon 9 rocket.

And the journey to the Falcon 9 began with the Falcon 1 in 2006. The first three launches of the Falcon 1 failed, and with only one more shot before the company went bankrupt, they finally got into orbit on the 4th launch.

Plans for a larger Falcon 1e were scrapped, as well as a Falcon 5, so that they could move forward with the Falcon 9 v1.0.

With this first version of the Falcon 9, SpaceX was able to win a contract to service the ISS through NASA’s COTS program by proving that the Dragon capsule was capable of carrying out resupply missions.

SpaceX then focused on reusability and developed the Falcon 9 v1.1, which they used to test landings over open water, at the same time testing vertical take off and landing with their grasshopper vehicle.

But it was the next version, the Falcon 9 Full Thrust, that was the first to land, first on a landing pad at Cape Canaveral, and then on a drone ship.

Incremental improvements lead to the Falcon 9 Block 4 and Block 5 that will launch for the first time this April.

Earlier this year, SpaceX launched the Falcon Heavy, which is 90% reusable, making spaceflight even more sustainable, but the ultimate reusable rocket is the upcoming BFR, which is completely reusable.

This is the ultimate implementation of the SpaceX vision.

5 Smaller Science YouTubers Worth Following

For this Random Thursday video, I thought I’d share with you some great science YouTube channels that deserve some attention.

Check these guys out!

Curious Elephant – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZUl…

Neoscribe – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvPB…

Undefined Behavior https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZ4o…

John Michael Godier https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEsz…

Up and Atom https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSIv…

Shoutout to JTheory https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCS-u…

 

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The Mars 2020 Rover (collab with Fraser Cain)

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The Mars Curiosity Rover is one of the most successful planetary missions of all time. Here’s how NASA plans to follow that up – the Mars 2020 Rover

 

Science Objective A: Explore once potentially-habitable areas

Science Objective B: Seek bio signatures

Science Objective C: Sample Caching

Science Objective D: Demonstrate in-situ resource utilization.

And here are the instruments that will make that possible. It contains 2 cameras on the probe’s mast, one called Mastcam-Z, which is the main “eye” for the rover.

It can take 360 degree panoramic 3D views with an advanced zoom that can see something the size of a housefly from the distance of a soccer field. And the second camera is called SuperCam.

This can actually do a spectrographic analysis of a rock’s chemical makeup from over 20 feet away by burning a hole in the rock as small as the point of a pencil.

This was developed in conjunction with a team from France. PIXL, or Planetary Instrument for X-Ray Lithochemistry will examine rock and soil samples for signs of ancient microbial life and can take extremely close up images of soil samples down to the size of a grain of salt. MEDA, the Mars Environmental Dynamics Analyzer is a contribution from a team in Spain, it’s a tiny weather lab that measures wind speed, temperature and humidity and also gathers data about dust particles in the Martian atmosphere.

RIMFAX, the Radar Imager for Mars Subsurface Experiment from Norway is basically like a sonogram that see tens of meters below the ground and detect elements down to the centimeter. This will help find underground water and ice on Mars. The aptly named SHERLOC, or Scanning Habitable Environments with Raman and Luminescence for Organics and Chemicals is a big sciency way of saying it looks for signs of ancient life with UV light, much like forensic investigators at crime scenes.

Hence, Sherlock. But SHERLOC will carry a couple of interesting things with it, one is a Mars meteorite for calibration purposes.

There’s a handful of meteorites found here on Earth that we know were once a part of Mars that were blasted away in an asteroid impact, then travelled through the solar system and eventually landed on Earth.

SHERLOC is going to carry a piece of one of those meteorites to use to calibrate its laser on the Martian surface, which means this will be the first time a piece of martian rock will be returned to Mars. The other thing is it will be carrying samples of materials that may be used to make Martian spacesuits, to see how well they fare in the Martian environment. And last but definitely not least is MOXIE, the Mars Oxygen ISRU Experiment.

This is the module that will be testing in situ resource utilization techniques in the hopes of turning the CO2 in the martian atmosphere into oxygen, just like a tree. The rover will also contain a special microphone, giving us the first sound recordings from the surface of Mars.