Tag: Math

Why Math Might Be Complete BS

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Mathematics is the backbone of all sciences, no theories or hypotheses are proven unless there is math to back it up. But there are many who believe that math isn’t real. In today’s video, we’ll break down the arguments.

From the Mathematical Physicalists to the Platonists to the Mathematical Fictionalists, we look at all the theories behind whether numbers actually exist, and what they mean.

The Largest Prime Number Was Discovered By A FedEx Employee

A FedEx employee in Tennessee has discovered the largest known prime number.

Germantown, Tenn., resident John Pace found the number through his volunteer work with the Great Internet Mersenne Prime Search (GIMPS), a project that crowd sources computing power to search for a subset of prime numbers called Mersenne primes.

Like a normal prime number, these can only be divided by themselves and one. What sets them apart is that they can all be expressed as the number 2 raised to a given power minus one.




The newly discovered Mersenne prime, called M77232917, can be expressed as 2 to the 77,232,917 power minus one. It’s the 50th Mersenne prime to be discovered and it’s more than 23 million digits long.

Pace might be the only person in history who went into math for the money.

He told NPR, “There was a $100,000 prize attached to finding the first prime that had a 10 million digit result, and I was like, ‘Well you know, I’ve got as much chance as anybody else.’

He has been participating in the program for 14 years and this is his first discovery.

The previous longest-known prime number was discovered in January of 2016 at the University of Central Missouri. It contains 22 million digits and is also a Mersenne prime.

Large prime numbers are important for the future of computing and cyber security, and the search is already on for larger numbers.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation is offering a prize of $150,000 for finding the first prime number with one hundred million digits and $250,000 for finding the first prime with one billion digits.

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Pass it on: Popular Science

Largest Known Prime Number Discovered With Over 23 Million Digits

A collaborative computational effort has uncovered the longest known prime number.

At over 23 million digits long, the new number has been given the name M77232917 for short.

Prime numbers are divisible only by themselves and one, and the search for ever-larger primes has long occupied maths enthusiasts.

However, the search requires complicated computer software and collaboration as the numbers get increasingly hard to find.




M77232917 was discovered on a computer belonging to Jonathan Pace, an electrical engineer from Tennessee who has been searching for big primes for 14 years.

Mr Pace discovered the new number as part of the Great Internet Mersenne Prime Search (GIMPS), a project started in 1996 to hunt for these massive numbers.

Mersenne primes – named after the 17th century French monk Marin Mersenne who studied them – are calculated by multiplying together many twos and then subtracting one.

Six days of non-stop computing in which 77,232,917 twos were multiplied together resulted in the latest discovery.

The number is the 50th Mersenne prime to be discovered, and the 16th to be discovered by the GIMPS project.

It is nearly one million digits longer than the previous record holder, which was identified as part of the same project at the beginning of 2016.

Mersenne primes are a particular focus for prime aficionados because there is a relatively straightforward way to check whether a number is one or not.

Nevertheless, the new prime has to be verified using four different computer programs on four different computers.

The process also relies on thousands of volunteers sifting through millions of non-prime candidates before the lucky individual chances upon their target.

Professor Caldwell runs an authoritative website on the largest prime numbers, with a focus on the history of Mersenne primes.

He emphasised the pure excitement that searching for prime numbers brings, describing the latest discovery as “a museum piece as opposed to something that industry would use”.

Besides the thrill of discovery, Mr Pace will receive a $3,000 (£2,211) GIMPS research discovery award.

GIMPS uses the power of thousands of ordinary computers to search for elusive primes, and the team behind it state that anybody with a reasonably powerful PC can download the necessary software and become a “big prime hunter”.

The next Mersenne prime discovery could be smaller or larger than the existing record holder, but the big target for the GIMPS team is to find a 100 million digit prime number.

The person who discovers such a number will be awarded $150,000 by the Electronic Frontier Foundation for their efforts.

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Pass it on: New Scientist

The 500-Page Proof That Only One Mathematician Can Understand

Nearly four years after Shinichi Mochizuki unveiled an imposing set of papers that could revolutionize the theory of numbers, other mathematicians have yet to understand his work or agree on its validity.

Although they have made modest progress.

Some four dozen mathematicians converged last week for a rare opportunity to hear Mochizuki present his own work at a conference on his home turf, Kyoto University’s Research Institute for Mathematical Sciences (RIMS).

Mochizuki is “less isolated than he was before the process got started”, says Kiran Kedlaya, a number theorist at the University of California, San Diego.

Although at first Mochizuki’s papers, which stretch over more than 500 pages, seemed like an impenetrable jungle of formulae.




Experts have slowly discerned a strategy in the proof that the papers describe, and have been able to zero in on particular passages that seem crucial, he says.

Mochizuki’s theorem aims to prove the important abc conjecture, which dates back to 1985 and relates to prime numbers — whole numbers that cannot be evenly divided by any smaller number except by 1.

The conjecture comes in a number of different forms, but explains how the primes that divide two numbers, a and b, are related to those that divide their sum, c.

If Mochizuki’s proof is correct, it would have repercussions across the entire field, says Dimitrov.

When you work in number theory, you cannot ignore the abc conjecture,” he says.

This is why all number theorists eagerly wanted to know about Mochizuki’s approach.”

For example, Dimitrov showed in January how, assuming the correctness of Mochizuki’s proof, one might be able to derive many other important results, including a completely independent proof of the celebrated Fermat’s last theorem.

But the purported proof, which Mochizuki first posted on his webpage in August 2012, builds on more than a decade of previous work in which Mochizuki worked in virtual isolation and developed a novel and extremely abstract branch of mathematics.

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Pass it on: New Scientist